ALL OUR AVAILABLE COURSES

POLICING – CERTIFICATE IN POLICING

This course will provide you with an entry route into policing if you wish to study before you apply to join a police force. (Level 5)
Older than 16 years and have succesfully passed Grade 12ORPre-qualification in Policing (Level 4)
Distance learing with a combination of Contact Classes and Vacation school sessions.
1 Year certificate, but IOL allows students to complete the certificate in three years.
Policing Laws AComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Interpret relevant sections of the Namibian Constitution and the Police act 19 of 1990. Provide an overview of the history of policing in Namibia Post and Pre Independence and provide the Municipal PoliceSpecific Exit Learning Outcome:After studying this module, you should be able to:describe relevant sections the Constitution of Namibia, describe the history of policing in Namibia, Post and Pre Independence, understand relevant sections of the Police Act 19 of 1990 provide an overview of the Municipal PolicePolicing Laws BComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine the organisation and functions of the Namibian Police Force and different responsibilities.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:After studying this module, you should be able to:Understand the Justice Sector and Rule of Law in Namibia Explain the Police Force’s responsibilities in general but especially when making an arrest, the use of firearms, the use of handcuffs, and diplomatic representatives Explain the responsibilities of the Municipal Police in line with the Local Authorities Act and Windhoek Municipal Service Regulations. English Communication AComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Explain and demonstrate the use of grammar, punctuation, tenses, questioning, active/passive voice, direct and indirect speech and reading methods.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Identify different parts of speech Explain the use of punctuation marks Explain the use of tenses in English Explain how to and combine sentences Illustrate the use of different types of questions Use active and passive voice, and apply direct and indirect speech Explain skimming, scanning and intensive reading methodsEnglish Communication BComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine and demonstrate methods of communication, different types of listening and questioning skills, writing of affidavit statements, and different kinds of correspondence.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe the criteria of communications. Understand good listening and questioning skills. Understand the writing of an affidavit statement. Understand the compiling of different kinds of correspondence.CHARGE OFFICE ADMINISTRATIONComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine the responsibilities of different members regarding the completion of the crime register, filing of case dockets, exhibits, lost, found and stolen property and illustrate how to complete different register and forms.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe the completion of the crime register (POL 1) by different members Describe the responsibilities of different members regarding the completion and filing of case dockets Clarify the rules and responsibilities of different officers regarding exhibits, lost, found and stolen property Explain how to complete a cell register, control register and an inquest docket Explain the purpose and how to complete the following forms and registers: notebook, occurrence book, indemnity by claimant form, register of exhibits and the receipt of arms Explain the laws and procedures regarding admission of guilt and granting of bail and completing relevant forms Explain the guidelines regarding the attendance register, circulations and cancellation of stolen vehicles, vehicle and owner’s identification certificates and investigator’s case register. Explain standing orders and the responsibility of the different members and the procedures followed with regards to property of prisoners. Describe the duties and responsibilities of different officers regarding the releasing, detention, cell management, guarding procedures, feeding and clothing, problems with and transfer and escort of prisoners. Explain regulations regarding transfer of prisoners and detention of juveniles, legalities and officers’ responsibilities regarding the detention of prisoners and completing relevant registers.CRIME PREVENTION 1Comprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine the duties and responsibilities of different members regarding several issues of police dogs and their handlers, the Air Wing Division and the Mounted Police Force.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe the duties, responsibilities, utilisation and general administration of the police dogs and their handlers in the Namibian Police. Describe the mission and circumstances under which air support by the Namibian Police Air Wing Division will be rendered. Describe the duties, responsibilities, utilisation and general administration of the Namibian Mounted Police Force. Explain the duties, objectives and types of police patrols. Understand recruitment, training and operations of a Traffic Unit in the Namibian Police and determining of ownership of a vehicle or vehicle particulars and the marking (including unmarked) of vehicles, suspected or stolen vehicles, not roadworthy or when a warrant of arrest is being issued in respect of such vehicle or driver. Understand an overview of border security processes. Explain Namibia’s legislation regarding terrorism-related cases.Investigative Principles AComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine the process and basic principles of investigations in terms of witness statements, search methods, collection of evidence, and chain of custody form and packaging of evidence and interviewing.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe the general guidelines of investigation and the importance of witness statements. Describe the different forms of evidence and discuss the different search methods. Describe the collection of evidence. Describe the elements related to the chain of custody form. Discuss the packaging of evidence and the handling thereof. Discuss the process of investigative interviewing.Investigative Principles BComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine the process and basic principles of investigations in terms of feedback to complainants, ‘identification’ and ‘individualisation’, reconstruction of crime scenes, methods and purpose of arrest, subpoena of witnesses and the writing up of case dockets.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Discuss how the police should give feedback to complainants about cases and how to prepare witnesses to give evidence in court. Describe the concepts of identification and individualisation. Describe the investigation and reconstruction of crime scenes. Explain the methods and purpose of arrest and how to execute warrants of arrest. Explain the subpoena of witnesses and the importance of the investigator attending court. Explain the procedure of completing and writing up of case dockets.Investigation of Crime 1 AComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Examine the investigation of vehicle accident scenes, culpable homicide, unnatural deaths and suicide and driving under the influence, public indecency and the obstruction of the course of justice.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe the responsibilities and investigation techniques of a police member at a vehicle accident scene. Describe the nature, causes and investigation of culpable homicide, unnatural deaths and suicide. Describe the investigation of driving under the influence, public indecency and the obstruction of the course of justice.Investigation of Crime 1 BComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Discuss the investigation of property crimes, stolen property and damage to property and crimes against the person.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe the nature and the investigation of property crimes. Describe the investigation of stolen property and damage to property. Discuss the investigation of crimes against the person.

POLICING – PRE-QUALIFICATION CERTIFICATE

(Bridging course) – It will provide you with an entry route into policing if you wish to study before you apply to join a police force. (Level 4)
Older than 16 years and have successfully passed Grade 10
Distance learning with a combination of Contact Class sessions and Vacations School sessions.
One year course, but IOL allows students up to twop years to complete the course.
COMPREHENSIVE EXIT LEARNING OUTCOME: Clarify the basic factors of stress, ways of time management, team dynamics and some theory and approaches to manage diversity.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Discuss the features ,factors and impact of stress Explain aspects of time management Define the concept team and explain elements of team dynamics Clarify theory and application of managing diversityBasic EnglishComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Explain and apply the parts of speech, punctuation, tenses and combining sentences in English.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Describe and identify the basic parts of speech of English grammar in texts Describe the importance and demonstrate the use of punctuation in written communication Explain and use the three basic tenses: Present Past and Future Clarify the use of conjunctions and combine sentencesMathematicsComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Explain and solve arithmetic, algebra, graphs and geometry problems.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Preform calculations with positive and negative numbers, decimal numbers Explain and preform operations with regard to fractions, ratios, percentages and calculators Explain and solve equations and indices and use and convert units correctly Draw and interpret different graphs Define and determine the sizes of circles, angles and trianglesInformation TechnologyComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Outline how to and preform activities in Internet and Emails, Word, Excel and Power Point.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Explain terminology and preform activities in Internet and Emails Outline how to and execute Word tasks Outline how to and preform activities in a spread sheet program Outline how to and preform activities in a presentation programHistory of Policing in NamibiaComprehensive Exit Learning Outcome:Explain the brief introduction of the history of policing in Namibia.Specific Exit Learning Outcome:Upon completion of this module students should be able to:Explain the historic development of the police force Explain the development of the police force in South Africa Describe the brief history of the Namibian Police Force

POLICING – DIPLOMA IN POLICING

This Diploma in Policing (POLD) design provides good quality for current and prospective police officers, private security personnel and other security agencies because it is designed with a clear rationale and ‘fit for purpose’ exit outcomes in the areas of the competent employee and graduate. Namibia Policing and security agencies perspectives complement the input from different local stakeholders such as NAMPOL, Municipal Police, Private Security Agencies a Principal Association and Regional Directors. Local policies and issues identified by the ‘Situations analysis section’ (Crebbin and Vision 2030, NQF) are accommodated by the POLD. The POLD allows students to continue with the IOL Bachelor Degree. The IOL Diploma in Policing has a broader scope and specialisation and are designed to address Namibian Police circumstances. In summary: The quality of the POLD curriculum is assured via the necessary total of credits, the levels of the content and the assessment and quality assurance features.(Level 6)
Certificate in Policing (Level 5)
Distance education with some practical contact classes and vacation school sessions.
2 Year Diploma but IOL allow students to complete it in 4 years.
Upon completion of Diploma in Policing, students will be able to:
  • Demonstrate broad understanding of the Namibian policing operational and administrative  interfaces at line and middle management levels;
  • Conduct limited policing operations, apply resource management at the lower management level and apply interpersonal skills in a law enforcement environment;
  • Balance constitutional and legal rights of individuals with the competence to legally infringe those rights in the service of maintaining a safe and secure society;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Human Rights;
  • Uphold and protect fundamental human rights by creating a responsive and proactive environment in a responsible manner.
  • Contribute to the implementation of preventative actions that law enforcement agencies need to take in crime mitigation;
  • Engage and interact effectively with various stakeholders in the criminal justice system including its sub-systems.
YEAR 1Semester 1
Course CodeCourse TitleComprehensive Learning OutcomePrerequisiteCompulsory/ElectiveNQFLevelNotionalHoursNQF Credits
 TBDPolicing Operations 2AAnalyse policing functions, roles and responsibilities in relation to policing purpose, ethics and professionalism. PolicingLaws B C  6 120 12
 TBDInvestigation of Crime 2AAnalyse criminal investigation skills and competencies and linked investigative principles to solve criminal events. Investigation of Crime 1B C 6 120 12
 TBDCrime Prevention Principles 1ADevelop an understanding of unique theoretical and conceptual constructs of crime prevention. None C 5 120 12
 TBDPolice-Public Relations: Theory & PracticeUnderstand the importance of police/public partnership in crime mitigation and prevention. None C 5 100 10
 TBDHuman Rights for PolicingUnderstand and apply constitutional safeguards on fundamental rights and freedoms in policing and criminal justice process, i.e. from arrest to incarceration. None C 5 100 10
 TBDApplied Communication in Policing 1Understand the theory and principles of advanced communication strategies used within a policing environment. English Communication B C 6 100 10
660NotionalHoursTotal Credits:66 
 Semester 2
Course CodeCourse TitleComprehensiveLearning OutcomePrerequisiteCompulsory/ElectiveNQF LevelNotionalHoursNQFCredits
 TBDPolicing Operations 2BApply goal-directed policing practices/ approaches in relation to policing functions, roles and responsibilities in a professional mannerPolicing Operations 2A C 6 120 12
 TBDInvestigation of Crime 2BApply criminal investigation skills and competencies and linked investigative principles to solve criminal eventsInvestigation of Crime 2A C 6 120 12
 TBDCrime Prevention Principles 1BApply crime prevention policies and initiatives and determine and understand the significance of situational crime prevention and Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) Principles.Crime Prevention Principles 1A C 6 120 12
 TBDCommunity Policing PrinciplesDeveloping and understanding the importance of engaging community residents in collaborative partnership for identifying and resolving crimes.Police-Public Relations: Theory & Practice C 5 100 10
 TBDSocial Dimensions of JusticeUnderstand the basis of the Namibian legal system, the nature of the Namibian law and criminal justice system and how it is applied and administered, how police and criminal justice functionaries, contribute towards building of a safer and more just society.None C 5 100 10
 TBDApplied Communication in Policing 2Demonstrate focused knowledge of the application, analysis and production of various types of documents used in organisations.Applied Communication in Policing 1 C 6 100 10
660NotionalHoursTotal Credits66
 YEAR 2Semester 3
CourseCodeCourse TitleComprehensiveLearning OutcomePrerequisiteCompulsory/ElectiveNQFLevelNotionalHoursNQFCredits
 TBDPolicing Administration 2AUnderstand police administration, i.e. policing skills, supervision and managerial skills as well as academic competences pertaining to police organisation and its environment.Policing Operations 2B C 6 120 12
 TBDInvestigative Techniques 1Apply skills to collect reliable information during crime investigation through the use various investigation techniques and providing reliable evidence before court of law.Investigative Principles 1B C 5 100 10
 TBDCriminal Law 1Understand & Explain the different theories of criminal lawNone C 6 120 12
 TBDCommunity Policing in Practice Understand and apply the skills necessary to undertake and assemble a community-based crime prevention plan.Community Policing Principles C 6 100 10
 TBDCriminologyExplain crime and its context within the paradigms of criminological theories. None C 5 120 12
 TBDProfessional WritingDisplay the proper application of grammatical structures and enhanced reading and professional writing skills.Applied Communication in Policing 2 C 6 100 10
660NotionalHoursTotal Credits66
 Semester 4
CourseCodeCourse TitleComprehensiveLearning OutcomePrerequisiteCompulsory/ElectiveNQF LevelNotionalHoursNQF Credits
 TBDPolicing Administration 2BConceptualise and contextualise the organisational theory principles in general and policing management aspects in particular.Policing Operations 2A C 6 120 12
 TBDLaw of Evidence and Criminal ProcedureAnalyse and evaluate procedural principles applicable when arresting or searching suspects, entering premises and seizing of property connected with criminal offencesNone C 6 120 12
 TBDCriminal Law 2Explain and apply knowledge of criminal law and general principles of criminal liabilityCriminal Law 1 C 6 120 12
 TBDPolicing in a Democracy Analyse and apply basic democratic policing principles to maintain social control, safety and security in a democratic society.Community Policing in Practice C 6 120 12
480NotionalHoursTotal Credits48
This assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and second opportunity exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules. Assessment policies and procedures are impacting on whether high standards are attained or not. Low standards of education do neither individuals nor schools or the country any favors.
  • Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 120 marks for modules worth 12 credits and 150 marks for modules of 16 or more credits.
  •  A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations.
  • Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills count for 50%; higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 40% and very high levels of thinking (evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks.
  • Re-submission of assignments is permissible, but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before writing the examination.
  • Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination.
  • The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for 16 and more credits a three-hour written examination of 150 marks apply, while 12 credits module paper is 2 hours and 120 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers it is spelled in the particular module.
  • A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 50% of the examination mark and 50% of the semester mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination.
  • Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Students can qualify with a 45 – 49% in an examination for a supplementary examination. If a student qualifies for a supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.
  • If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam.
  • Tutors / lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement.
  • The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the Policing Diploma over 3 years.
  • Students could in future receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

ADVANCED CERTIFICATE IN SENIOR PRIMARY EDUCATION – ACPE

GRADE 1 – 7 TEACHERS The overall goal/ rationale of the Senior-primary Advanced Certificate is to develop skilled, committed and insightful professionals who have the subject knowledge and pedagogical skills to promote effective and inclusive learning in primary schools. The rationale for the proposed level 7 Advanced Certificate in Senior primary is to offer a quick and effective one year upgrading qualification. This Advanced Certificate would ensure a proper starting point for national human resources development because a solid senior primary foundation will support secondary learner success in school. (Level 7)
 An applicant shall satisfy the following minimum requirements:(a)   Be a holder of a three year lower or senior primary teacher qualification such as BETD, JPTED, SPTED or any other recognised level 6 diploma.(b)   The applicant must have at least three years of teaching experience, preferably in senior primary, but lower primary or junior secondary experience is also acceptable.(c)   The two major senior primary school subjects to be selected in the Advanced Certificate must have been offered in their three year qualification. Alternatively, at least one of the two majors must have been offered in their three year qualification and the other major was offered in grade 12.Select any two of the following major areas:
  • English (7 periods per week)
  • Another language / Mother Tongue (6)
  • Mathematics (7)
  • Natural Science and Health (5)
  • Social Studies (5)
This Advanced Certificate is offered over one year via distance supplemented by Contact class sessions via LYNC.
This qualification is offered over one year but candidates however are allowed to complete it within three years.
Students who have completed this Advanced Certificate would be able to:(1) Explain and demonstrate general English proficiency, academic communication and assertive communication skills.(2) Explain sexual health related topics, features of planets, light, electricity, plants and animals, ecosystems and –components as well as systems of the human body; explain some features of matter, features of ionic and metallic bonding, types, properties and uses of materials, environmental chemistry, composition, uses and pollution of air, features of water, power and mechanics, features of energy, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound and light and discuss some teaching methodology aspects, regarding these topics.(3) Explain the forms and levels of language learning, discuss theories of language development in learners and explain issues of developing learners’ listening skills, speaking and reading, some basic and transactional writings as well as teaching methodology and assessing of language development.(4) Interpret data and explain operations with whole numbers, common and decimal fractions, time, money and solving problems with length, mass and two and three dimensional shapes. Solve number problems involving direct and indirect proportions, do calculations with money, volume and surface areas, perform different geometric calculations, perform algebraic operations, draw function graphs, draw and interpret histograms and calculate probability and solve trigonometry problems in right-angled triangles as well as methods to teach and assess such content.(5) Explain the development of Namibian nationalism, South African colonial administration, role of the church before independence, events prior to independence, the African struggle for independence and economic development, developments of world history in the 20th century, read maps and weather data, explain Namibian ecology, regional geography and population geography and aspects of geomorphology.(6) Discuss important theories and aspects of senior primary learner development and learning and its implications for teachers.(7) Discuss and apply concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support senior primary learners’ learning in different subject areas.(8) Discuss theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.(9) Discuss models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.(10) Discuss some Physical Science issues regarding speed, mass and density, pressure, thermal physics, and properties of waves, light and sound, electricity and electromagnetism, practical electric circuitry and nuclear physics and some methodology aspects.(11) Explain characteristics of written and visual literature, analyse novels, dramas and poetry and grammar and discuss how to teach it.(12) Explain and do calculations with numbers, algebraic representation, formulae, indices and Manipulations, do calculations of polynomials, explain and apply logarithms and sequences theory and draw and interpret graphs. Explain function notation and linear programming, coordinate geometry, use geometrical terms, facts and applications, calculate angles in triangles, analyse data, calculate probability and geometrical transformations and vectors and discuss teaching methodology aspects.(13) Discuss geographical and historical topics, including plate tectonics, formation of land- and marine forms, atmospheric processes, topographical maps, geographical enquiry skills, population dynamics, agricultural systems, tourism industry, the collapse of international peace by 1939, Nazi Party rule of Germany, USA between 1914 – 1941, skills for historians and aspects of teaching methodology.(14) Discuss theories and demonstrate skills of counselling and rendering inclusive learner support.(15) Discuss theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning: management functions, concepts and styles, management skills, the school as an organisation, financial management, management of health and safety and personnel management.(16) Execute specified senior primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.
Table 9:  ACE Senior-primary Curriculum Framework  (Level 7, 149 credits)Year 1:   semester  1  (78  credits)
Module Title and CodeComprehensive exit learning outcomesNotional hoursNQF CreditsNQF levelPre-requisite
English and Academic Communication SkillsExplain and demonstrate general English proficiency, academic communication and assertive communication skills.120125None
Module 1 of Major School Subject 1: Select one of the 4 options  and the first subject of that option:1. Natural Science and Health+  English  OR2. English   + Social ScienceOR3.  Mathematics   + EnglishOR4.  Mathematics   + NaturalScience and HealthExplain  up to grade 10 content  and  teaching methodology of  the  first subject  of your majors’ option160165At least one major must have been offered in the 3-year qualification
Module 1 of Major school Subject 2: Select the second subject of your  majors option:1.   Natural Science and Health+  English  OR2.   English  + Social ScienceOR3.   Mathematics  + EnglishOR4.  Mathematics  + NaturalScience and HealthExplain  up to grade 10 content  and  teaching methodology of  the  second  subject  of your majors’ option160165At least one major must have been offered in the 3-year qualification
Learner Development and LearningDiscuss important theories and aspects of senior primary learner development and learning and its implications for teachers.120127None
Classroom Teaching and ManagementDiscuss and apply concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support senior primary learners’ learning in different subject areas.120127None
Assessment and EvaluationDiscuss theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically, evaluate feedback instruments and reporting  of assessment results100107None
Total78078
Year 1:  semester 2   (71 credits)
Module Title and CodeGuidelines for designNotional hoursNQF CreditsNQF levelPre-requisite
Inclusive Education and Specific DifficultiesDiscuss models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.100107Learner Development and Learning
Module 2 of Major school Subject 1: 1.   Natural Science and Health+  English   OR2.   English  + Social ScienceOR3.  Mathematics  + EnglishOR4.  Mathematics  + NaturalScience and HealthExplain  the grade 12 content  and  teaching methodology  aspects of  the  first subject  of your majors option160166Module 1 of relevant major and Classroom Teaching and Management
Module 2 of Major school Subject 2: Select the second subject of your  majors option:1.   Natural Science and Health+  English    OR2.   English  + Social ScienceOR3.   Mathematics  + EnglishOR4.  Mathematics  + NaturalScience and HealthExplain  the grade 12 content  and  teaching methodology  aspects of  the  first subject  of your majors option160166Module 1 of relevant majorand Classroom Teaching and Management
Counselling and Learner SupportDiscuss theories and demonstrate skills of counselling and rendering inclusive learner support.100107None
Educational ManagementDiscuss theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning: management functions, concepts and styles, management skills, the school as an organisation, financial management, management of health and safety and personnel management.100107None
School- based StudiesExecute specified senior primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.903 weeks in Senior primary school97Enrolled for 2nd semester courses
Total710 71
(a)   Students have a heavy workload of 6 modules per semester which carries 78 and 71 credits respectively. Each credit requires ten notional hours.  Student learning hours or Notional hours are estimated at slightly more than double the teaching hours since it includes individual learning, face-to-face sessions, practical work and doing assignments for continuous assessment. The notional hours allocated to a subject / module is guided by the weight that the National Professional Standards for Teachers in Namibia (NPST) allocate to a standard.Credits on level 5:  = 44Credits on level 6:  = 32Credits on level 7:  = 73  (minimum required 72 credits)Total 149 credits   (minimum required 120 credits)(b)  This programme comprises 149 credits which are 29 credits above the NQF minimum requirement of 120. Of the 149 credits a total of 73 credits are on level 7. There is a 46:54% acceptable ratio among school subject content (64 credits) and professional subjects (85 of which 9 credits are for School- based learning).(c)  The National prescribed major school subjects for the senior-primary such as Mathematics, Natural Science and Health, English and Social Studies are addressed.  Mathematics and the other major school subjects incorporate both the prescribed subject content for upper and beyond as well as the methodology up to level 7.  The professional subjects are on level 7 and include all key NPST standards except for the last two standards of Mentoring and Professional and Community Development.(d)   Namibian indigenous knowledge / facts/ policies / NIED documents are also included in the professional subjects.(e)   The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop skills is emphasised. Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. See for example Educational Management and Counselling and Learner Support.(f)   As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggested, the curriculum further addresses ‘English language proficiency. In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘good governance’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to.(g)   The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. subject knowledge and the didactics of it. The Subject Methodologies encompasses also the LCE paradigm as advocated in Namibia. Purposeful assignments and lesson preparations direct the learning during School-Based Studies. Since admitted students must have 3 years teaching experience, only 3 weeks School-Based experiences are required for formal evaluation.(h)  The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum in order not to slow down student progress unnecessary.Assessment PolicyThis assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and supplementary exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules.Continuous assessment per semester modules consists of assessment opportunities, like assignments and or practicals, 120 marks for modules of 10 or 12 credits and 130 marks for modules of 14-16 credits. *      An aggregate of 50% semester / continuous assessment mark is required for admission to examinations.Where practical work is applicable, a 60% pass is required and such work could account for up to 50% of the continuous assessment mark / semester mark. Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. At least thirty percent (30%) of assignments and examination papers should be on a higher order thinking level where marks are allocated to thinking about facts. Re-submission of assignments is permissible at extra costs but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before the examination. Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination. The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for 10 or 12 credits a two and a half-hour written examination of 120 marks apply, while a14-16 credit module examination has a duration of 3 hours and counts 130 marks. A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester / continuous assessment mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination. Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August.  Students can qualify with a 45 - 49% in an examination for a supplementary. May-students can thus write a supplementary in August and the August students that qualify can write a supplementary in November.  If a student qualifies for the supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees. If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and at extra cost could sit for the third examination. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam. The School- based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of ‘lesson preparation’ and another of’ lesson presentation’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. The School Based Studies forms, regulations and arrangements must be in place. Lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement. The practice of providing students with an examination scope before examinations, should merely point out core themes, questions and sections and the format of the examination The ‘given scope’ should NOT promise that the exam paper will only cover the ‘scope’ content. English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses should preferably be certified separately (Crebbin recommendation 3.2.3).The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another prior module. IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the Advanced Certificate over 3 years so it is very difficult to specify the amount of modules per year. A realistic guideline may however be to pass  about 40 % of the subjects per year, since this will then take 2.5 years to complete the Students receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

DJPE – DIPLOMA IN JUNIOR PRIMARY EDUCATION

The overall goal/ rationale of the Junior Primary Diploma is to develop skilled, committed and insightful professionals who have the subject knowledge and pedagogical skills to promote effective and inclusive learning in Junior primary schools. The proposed new level 7 Junior Primary Diploma qualification is to offer a three year Namibian designed, initial teacher education qualification which meet all Namibian requirements and do not force students into a level 8 qualification which is longer in duration and more expensive. This Diploma would ensure a proper starting point for national human resources development, because a solid foundation will support further learner success in school. (Level 7) Grade 0 – 3
(a) The admission to a Diploma requires a minimum score of 22 points in the 5 best school subjects. The following will be taken into consideration when computing the point scores according to the grade evaluation table further on:Be a holder of a Namibian Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary/ Higher or recognised equivalent with a minimum of 22 points in five subjects according to the grade evaluation table. One of the five subjects must be English NSSC Ordinary (English as a Second Language) obtained with a grade C minimum or English as First language with grade D A second one of the five best subjects must be NSSC Ordinary Mathematics obtained with grade D It is recommended that another one of the five best subjects is a Mother Tongue OR(b) Meet the requirements of mature age entry which means:A student should be at least 23 years old on the day of registration Should have completed successfully junior secondary education – Grade 12 ORIf only Grade 10, then you need two years teaching experience A student should be at least 23 years old on the day of registration OR(c) Transfer from the IOL ‘Pre-Primary Diploma’ to this new ‘Junior Primary Diploma’ with recognition for all credits accumulated.
IOL offers ALL qualifications via the distance education mode which broadens the access to tertiary education because students do not have to move to Windhoek. This full time level 7 diploma is offered over three years via distance with a combination of telephone tutoring and vacation school face-to-face sessions.
This qualification is offered over three years, but candidates may use six years to complete this qualification.
Students who have completed this diploma would be able to:(1) Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as in academic communication skills.(2) Explain concepts of Information Technology and demonstrate using MS Word, MS Excel, Power point, the Internet and e-mails, desktop publishing, and outline Information Science aspects.(3) Interpret issues of language in society and culture, Mother Tongue language structure and use and the development and support of junior-primary learners’ listening, speaking, incidental and preparatory reading and writing competencies.(4) Examine issues regarding the development of religious identity, values, happiness, emotional intelligent social behaviour, Life Skills and the teaching-learning aspects of the junior primary RME syllabus.(5) Illustrate and clarify theories, principles and skills to draw, build models, do constructing and collage work and examine aspects of teaching-learning and assessing grade 1-3 art creations.(6) Discuss reading process theories, the developmental role of literature for learners, how to teach effective reading, assess reading materials and support learners’ reading.(7) Apply school readiness, diversity and multi-grade teaching theories and activities.(8) Examine theoretical music and drama perspectives, how to involve learners in music and drama learning activities, express artistic opinions assertively and stage a live music and acting performance in the school.(9) Examine basic health and physiology issues, games and other teaching-learning opportunities for different types of physical development from pre-primary till grade 3, playground features and supervision, training issues for primary athletes and management of sport meetings.(10) Execute specified pre-primary and lower primary school based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.(11) Analyse important aspects of learner development and learning and its implications for teachers.(12) Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education, selected historical figures, aspects of international and Namibian educational developments over time, and compare historical developments among selected countries.(13) Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and senior primary learners’ learning in different subject areas.(14) Analyse the features, application and impact of aspects of Namibian history, culture, infrastructure, economic, geographical features and biological and science issues, as well as methods and materials to teach and assess environmental education content from pre-primary till grade 3.(15) Clarify the development of pre-primary numeracy, the four basic mathematical operations, the measurements of time, length, mass and capacity, and two and three dimensional shapes as well as teaching methodology aspects up to grade 3.(16) Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.(17) Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education as disciplines and the features and impact of some sociological aspects, including educational laws, and selected philosophical schools of thought on schooling.(18) Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.(19) Evaluate the use of ‘traditional’ classroom educational resources and modern technologies in classroom communication, learning theories, inclusive education and assessment, as well as the management of classroom media and resource centres and the use of peer tutoring in schools.(20) Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal.(21) Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; Management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management.(22) Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school.(23) Examine and apply theories and activities about supporting the learning of junior-primary learners’ learning of Mathematics.(24) Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in life skills and render inclusive learner support.(25) Examine theories of language learning, English structural issues and vocabulary and methods and activities to teach listening, speaking, reading, writing and grammar in the junior primary phase.(26) Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps and evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.(27) Argue about issues of the Namibian teaching profession, professionalism, development issues as well as activities and evaluate the community development roles of professionals, the development of one’s emotional intelligence, thinking skills and job searching and entrepreneurial skills.
Diploma in Junior Primary Education curriculum (381 credits)  Year 1: semester 1  (66 credits) 
Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes National hours NQF credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 English and AcademicCommunication Skills 1 Clarify and demonstrate general and academic English proficiency in listening, reading, speaking and correct use of grammar.  120 12 5 Admission  C in EnglishOrdinary
 Computer Literacy Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate how to create files and manage documents with the MS Word programme as well as how to locate and analyse information sources.   80 8 2 None
  Mother Tongue Literacy  and Development 1  Interpret issues of language in society and culture, the development of pre-primary and grade 1 literacy in listening, speaking, preparatory and incidental reading and preparatory writing, Mother Tongue language structure, grammar and use.   80  8  5  None
 Religious, Moral and LifeSkills Education 1 Examine issues regarding the development of religious identity, values, emotional intelligent social behaviour, Life Skills and the teaching-learning aspects of the pre-primary and grade 1 RME syllabus.  120 12 5 None
 Visual Art Illustrate and clarify theories, principles and skills to draw, build models, do constructing and collage work and examine aspects of teaching-learning and assessing grade 1-3 art creations.  100 10 5 None
 Children’s Literature and Reading Support Discuss reading process theories, the developmental role of literature for learners, how to teach effective reading, assess reading materials and support learners’ reading.  80 8 7 None
Learner Support: School readiness, Diversity & Multi-grade teachingApply school readiness, diversity & multi-grade teaching theories and activities 80 8 7 None
Total  66066  
 Year 1: semester 2  (66 credits)
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 English and AcademicCommunication Skills 2 Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in grammar, different types of writing as well as in academic writing conventions.   120  12  5  Module 1
 Computer LiteracyExplain theoretical aspects and demonstrate using MS Excel, Power point, the Internet, e-mails, desktop publishing and outline Information Science aspects.  80 8 2 Module 1 
 Mother Tongue Literacy  and Development 2 Examine the development of grade 2 literacy in listening, speaking, preparatory and incidental reading and preparatory writing, Mother Tongue language structure, grammar and use.  80 8 5 Module 1
  Religious, Moral and LifeSkills Education 2  Examine issues regarding the development of religious identity, values, happiness, responsibilities, Life Skills and the teaching-learning aspects of the RME syllabus for grade 2 and 3.  120 12 5 None
 Music, Dance and Drama Examine theoretical music and drama perspectives, how to involve learners in music and drama learning activities, express artistic opinions assertively and stage a live music and acting performance in the school.  100 10 6 None
 Physical and HealthEducation 1 Examine the functioning of the human body, healthy nutrition and living and examine the teaching-learning of the physical education syllabus for the pre- primary and grade 1 phase.  80 8 5 None
 School-Based StudiesPhase 1 Execute specified pre-primary school based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.  804 weeks  8 5 None
Total 660 66  
 Year 2: semester 1  (credits 64)
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Mother Tongue Literacy and Development  3 Examine the development of grade 3 literacy in listening, speaking, reading and writing, Mother Tongue language structure, grammar and use.  80 8 6 Module 2
 Learner Development and Learning Analyse important aspects of primary learner development and learning and its implications for teachers.  120 12 7 None
 Educational Foundations 1 Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education, selected historical figures, aspects of international and Namibian educational developments over time, and compare historical developments among selected countries.  80 8 7 None
 Classroom Teaching and Management Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and senior primary learners’ learning in different subject areas.  120 12 7 None
  Physical and HealthEducation 2  Examine basic health and physiology issues, games, playground features and supervision, training issues for primary athletes, management of sport meetings and the teaching-learning of the physical education syllabus for grade 2 and 3.   80  8  6  None
 Environmental Education 1 Interpret features of health, nutrition and safety as well as dimensions of the social and natural environment.  80 8 5 None
 Numeracy and Mathematics 1 Clarify the development of pre-primary numeracy, the four basic mathematical operations, the measurements of time, length, mass and capacity and teaching methodology aspects.  80 8 5 NSSC gr  Dadmission
Total64064  
 Year 2: semester 2  ( 62 credits)
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Inclusive Education and Specific Difficulties Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.  100 10 7 None
 Educational Foundations 2 Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education as disciplines and the features and impact of some sociological aspects, including educational laws, and selected philosophical schools of thought on schooling.  100 10 8 None
  Assessment and Evaluation Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.  100  10  7  None
  Teaching-learning Resources 1   Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication, learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different strategies and methods.    80   8   7   None
 Environmental Education 2 Clarify aspects of Namibian culture, infrastructure, economic, civic and geographical features, as well as aspects of the natural environment and methods and materials to teach and assess environmental education content for grade 2 and 3.  80 8 6 None
 Numeracy and Mathematics 2 Interpret data and explain operations with whole numbers, common and decimal fractions, time, money and solving problems with length, mass and two and three dimensional shapes as well as methods to teach and assess such content for grade 2 and 3.  80 8 5 Module 1
 School-Based StudiesPhase 2 Execute specified grade 2-3 school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular year of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.  804 weeks  8 6 PassedSBS phase 1
Total62062    
 Year 3: semester 1  (63 credits)
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Educational Research Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal.  120 12 7 None
 Educational Management Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning: management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management  100 10 7 None
 Environmental Education 3 Analyse the features, application and impact of geographical, historical, biological and natural science subject issues that inform environmental education.  120 12 6 Module 2
 Numeracy and Mathematics 3 Clarify and apply the content of Mathematics as school subject.  80 8 6 Module 2
 Teaching-learning Resources 2 Evaluate the use of educational resources and technologies in different subjects, its role in inclusive education and assessment, the management of classroom media and resource centres and the use of peer tutoring in schools. 100 10 8 Module 1
 Basic First Aid Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school. 30 3 4 None
 School-Based StudiesPhase 3 Execute specified grade 1-3 school based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular year of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.  804 weeks   8 7 PassedSBS phase 2
Total63063  
  Year 3: semester 2  (60 credits)
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Learning Support  in Mathematics Examine and apply theories and activities about supporting the learning of junior-primary learners’ learning of Mathematics.  80 8 7 Module 3 Maths
 Counselling  and Learner Support 1 Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in life skills and render inclusive learner support.  100 10 7 None
 English 2nd Language Teaching  Examine theories of language learning, English structural issues and vocabulary and methods and activities to teach listening, speaking, reading, writing and grammar in the junior prim phase. 120 12 5 None
  Curriculum Studies Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps and evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.  100 10 7 None
 Professional & Community Development Argue issues of the Namibian teaching profession, professionalism, development issues as well as activities and evaluate the community development roles of professionals, the development of one’s emotional intelligence (EI), thinking skills and job searching and entrepreneurial skills.  120 12 8 None
 School-Based StudiesPhase 4 Execute specified grade 1-3 school based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular year of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.  804 weeks in  8 7 PassedSBS phase 3
Total60060 
 
ASSESSMENT POLICY This assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and second opportunity exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules. Assessment policies are reflecting the promotion of high or low standards of education and is therefore very important. Low standards of education do neither individuals, companies nor the country any favors.Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and 1 assignment of 120 marks for modules worth 10 or 12 credits.A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations.Where practical work is applicable, a 60% pass is required and such practical work could account for 50% of the semester mark. This applies to School-Based Studies as well.Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills count for 50% ; Higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 40% and very high levels (of evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks.Re-submission of assignments is permissible at extra costs but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission deadlines before writing the examination.Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination.The duration of the examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for 10 or 12 credits modules the examination is typical 1 x two and a half-hour written examination of 120 marks, while an 8 credits module paper is 1 x 2 hours and 100 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers instead of 1 paper, it is spelled out at the particular module.A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester / continuous assessment mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination.Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Students can qualify with a 45 – 49% in an examination for a supplementary. May-students can thus write a supplementary in August and the August students that qualify can write a supplementary in November. If a student qualifies for the supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees as for the first enrolment. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam.The School-Based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of ‘lesson preparations’ and another of ‘lesson presentations’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. The School-Based Studies forms, regulations and arrangements will be in place.Lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement.English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses could be certified separately (Crebbin recommendation 3.2.3).The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the Diploma over 6 years.Students could receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

GRADE 12 – NSSC

These subjects are offered on Ordinary Level on distance mode, with a combination of Contact Classes and Vacation school sessions.
16 Years or older
These subjects are offered on Ordinary Level on distance mode, with a combination of Contact Classes and Vacation school sessions.
All subjects are offered over one year.
4116 English Second Language – Core and Extended4322 Biology4323 Physical Science4324 Mathematics – Core and Extended4331 Development Studies4332 Geography4333 History4345 Accounting4346 Business Studies4347 EconomicsNB!! Kindly note that examinations will run at the same time as that of the Ministry of Education.

DIPLOMA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION – DSE

The rationale for the proposed new level 7 Diploma in Secondary Education qualification is to offer a quick and effective upgrading of secondary teachers having a level 6 qualification that would benefit both the individual and the national standards of education. This effective upgrading to a level 7 involves school subject content of 2 school subjects, their methodologies and understanding of the learner development and teaching science, learner counselling, assessment, inclusive support, teaching-learning resources, curriculum studies and educational management and research. (level 7)
Option A:Be a holder of a three year secondary teacher qualification such as BETD with a pecialization in Junior Secondary OR any other recognised level 6 secondary diploma. The two school subjects to be selected in the DSE must have been taken in grade 12 (D in ordinary level) OR in the three year Diploma, as majors in the junior secondary specialisation. At least three years secondary teaching experience in the 2 school subjects to be selected in the DSE. Option B:Transfer from the ‘Advanced Certificate in Secondary Education’ to the new ‘Diploma in Secondary Education’ with recognition for all credits accumulated.
Distance mode delivery with some contact classes sessions and vacation school sessions.
Students may complete the DSE in one and a half years (that means enrolling for the subjects of the three semesters as is prescribed per semester) but IOL allows students to complete the Diploma within three years.
(1) Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as in academic communication skills.(2) Analyse important aspects of learner development and learning and its implications for teachers.(3) Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and senior secondary learners’ learning in different subject areas.(4) Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.(5) Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals, as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.(6) Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different learning activities and methods.(7) Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in life skills and render inclusive learner support.(8) Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management.(9) Examine and apply the content of two selected school subjects.(10) Explain and apply the theories of Subject Didactics and remedial Learner Support for two selected school subjects.(11) Explain concepts of Information Technology and demonstrate using MS Word, MS Excel, Power Point, the Internet and e-mails, desktop publishing and outline Information Science aspects.(12) Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal.(13) Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps and evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.(14) Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.These outcomes are supportive of employment as secondary teachers in the Namibian private or public sector and allows for awarding of a level 7 Diploma in Secondary Education.
                                           (NQF Level 7, 202 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
YEAR 1  (134 credits)SEMESTER 1 (64 credits)     
 English and Academic Communication Skills 1 Clarify and demonstrate general and academic English proficiency in listening, reading, speaking and correct use of grammar.  120  12  5 C in English gr 12, OrdinaryOr equivalent proof 
 Learner Development and Learning Analyse important aspects of learner development and learning and its implications for teachers.  120 12 7 None
 Classroom Teaching and Management Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and secondary learners’ learning in different subject areas. 120 12 7 None
 Assessment & Evaluation Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents. 100 10 7 None
 Inclusive Education andSpecific Difficulties Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals, as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children. 100 10 7 None
 Teaching-learningResources 1 Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication, as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different learning activities and methods. 80 8 7 None
Total hours and credits64064
 SEMESTER 2 (70 credits)      
 English and Academic Communication Skills 2 Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in grammar, different types of writing as well as in academic writing conventions.  120  12  5  Module 1
 Counselling and Learner Support 1 Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in Life Skills and render inclusive learner support.  100  10  7 Module of ‘Learner Development and Learning’
 Educational Management Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management. 100 10 7 None
 School Subject 1 (SS 1) Examine and apply the content of a selected school subject. 160 16 6 D in Gr 12 or major in prior diploma
 Subject Didactics and Learner Support for SS 1 Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics for the first selected school subject. 140 14 7 None
 Computer Literacy Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate how to create files and manage documents with the MS Word programme as well as how to locate and analyse information sources.  80 8 2 None
Total hours and credits70070
 YEAR 2:   SEMESTER 3 (68 credits)  
 School Subject 2 (SS 2) Examine and apply the content of a second selected school subject. 160 16 6 D in Gr 12 or major in prior diploma
 Subject Didactics and Learner Support for SS 2 Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics for the second selected school subject. 140 14 7 None
 Education Research Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal. 120 12 7 None
 Curriculum Studies Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps, and evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia. 100 10 7 None
 Computer Literacy Explain theoretical aspects and demonstrate using MS Excel, Power point, the Internet, e-mails, desktop publishing and outline information Science aspects. 80 8 2 Module 1
 School-Based Studies Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons. 3 weeks in secondaryschool (80) 8 7 None
Total hours and credits68068
 

Clarifications of the curriculum:

(a) A reasonable workload for Namibian higher education full time students is between 60 and 70 credits or between 5 and 7 modules per semester. A module with 2 periods/ teaching hours per week for a semester (of 14 weeks) typically counts 8 credits in the UNAM context. Student learning hours or Notional hours are estimated at slightly more than double the teaching hours since it includes individual learning, face-to-face sessions, practical work and doing assignments for a semester mark. The notional hours (or number of periods per week) allocated to a subject / module are guided by the weight that the National Professional Standards for Teachers in Namibia (NPST) allocate to a standard. Each credit requires ten notional hours.(b) This programme comprises of three semesters and 202 credits with an admission of a level 6 secondary qualification. This means this Diploma is equivalent to a 3 year / level 7 Diploma of 360 credits, with 158 accredited for the level 6 prerequisite qualification and 202 offered by this new IOL proposed Diploma in Secondary Education. The 202 credits are fully equal to the professional modules which post-graduate Diplomas offer, but this Secondary Diploma includes two school subjects and therefore the credits must be more than for a post-graduate Secondary Diploma.(c)   Of the 202 credits, a total of 130 credits are on level 7 which is 58 credits more than the NQF requirement of 72 credits on the level of certification. The ‘school subject / learning area’ content oriented credits (SS1 and 2, Subj. Didactics, English and Academic Com. Skills and School-based studies) totals 92 credits and the ‘professional oriented’ credits totals 110.  This represents a credits ratio of 45.5% subject content versus 54.5% professional skills.  The bottom line is that the Secondary Diploma pays a balanced attention to the occupational roles and graduate requirements as indicated by the ‘Situation analysis’ Section.(d) As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggested, the curriculum addresses ‘English language proficiency; adequate subject content and teaching methodology of it; learning support and quality assurance via proper admission criteria and required credits and levels.  In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘good governance’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to e.g. see the module descriptors and Section 7 on Assessment Policy and Section 9 on Quality assurance and accreditation.(e)   Some observations in terms of the broad structure of the programme are:  The National Professional Standards for Teachers are adhered to in modules. The basics of several level 8 specialisations are covered in this Diploma in Secondary Education, e.g. Classroom Teaching and Management and Assessment and Evaluation form the basis for the IOL level 8  Teaching and Assessment Mentoring, while Educational Management prepares students for School Leadership and Management; Curriculum Studies prepare students for Curriculum Theory and Practices. In addition, the foundation is laid for level 8 Research, Teaching-learning Resources 2 and Counselling and Learner Support 2. The design of the Diploma thus allow upward mobility for students to the IOL B. Ed Honours.(f)     Unwritten policy requires secondary teachers to be able to teach in two school subjects, therefore this Diploma prescribe the selection of two school subjects and their methodologies. The 9 options of selected major school subjects for this Diploma include: English, Mathematics, Geography, History, Business Studies, Computer Studies, Economics, Accounting and Biology which cover some of the scarce subjects in Namibia. Diploma students should be able to teach on the grade 12 Ordinary level which is the greater need after the 2015 changes to the secondary curriculum.(g)    The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum to support the tempo of completing the Diploma: Enrolment for ‘Counselling and Learner Support’ in the second semester requires a pass of ‘Learner Development and Learning’ in the first semester. English and Academic Communication Skills and Computer Literacy are the only additional subjects that require a pass in module 1 to proceed with module 2. (h)   As the module descriptors later on reflects, the Subject Didactics incorporate teaching-learning methods, media and national subject syllabus assessment aspects as well as remedial learning support in the school subject. Subject Didactics also include ‘subject file’ management as part of instructional management. NIED approved textbooks are also prescribed.(i)   The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. subject knowledge and the didactics of it. The Subject Didactics encompasses also the LCE paradigm as advocated in Namibia. The CBE quality perspective of ‘meeting purposefully designed standards’ is adhered to. (j) The module titles of the curriculum reflect the rationale and exit learning outcomes and a CBE systematic ‘design down’ is thus observable. What are obviously missing are typical subject titles such as ‘History of Education, Philosophy and Comparative Education’ as part of ‘Education Theory’ in the NPST. These Educational Foundation subjects were however already covered in the prior diploma (e.g. Education Theory and Practice /ETP in BETD) and are not the focus of this Diploma again, apart from an already full programme. (k)   The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop skills is emphasised.  Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. The professional modules include studying the relevant Namibian education policies and NIED compiled documents. (l)  The School-Based Studies should be done in a secondary school since the focus of the Diploma is on secondary education. The proposed 3 weeks are not ideal but it is required that teachers have at least three years teaching experience and since this is a secondary teaching qualification, teachers must at least experience the secondary reality in specialisation subjects if they are currently teaching in other subjects contexts. The supervised 3 weeks allow IOL to allocate a formal mark to students’ practical, demonstrated abilities.(m) The Diploma incorporates international trends in higher education, such as the development of occupational competence; the ability to use ICT; awareness of HIV/AIDS; responsiveness to local educational needs; co-operation rather than competition between people; integration of disciplinary knowledge into some modules and sound management theories for personal and national school efficiency and effectiveness.

Assessment Policy

  • Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and the length of assignments increase for subjects worth more than 8 credits, e.g. 120 marks for modules of 12 credits and 150 marks for modules of 16 or more credits.
 
  •  A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations.
  • A 60% pass is required for practical work and such work could account for 50% of the
semester mark. The 60% applies to School-based studies as well.Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills count for 50%; higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 40% and very high levels of thinking (evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks.  
  • Re-submission of assignments is permissible, but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before writing the examination.
 
  • Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination.
 
  • The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for 16 and more credits a three-hour written examination of 150 marks apply, while an 8 to12 credits module paper is 2 hours and 100 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers it is spelled in the particular module.
 
  • A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination.
 
  • Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Students can qualify with a 45 – 49% in an examination for a supplementary examination. If a student qualifies for a supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.
If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam.
  • The School-Based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of ‘lesson preparations’ and the third of ‘lesson presentations’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. The School-Based Studies forms, regulations and arrangements will be in place.
  • Tutors / lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement.  
  • English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses could be certified separately.
 
  • The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the DSE over 3 years. 
 
  • Students could in future receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION: SECONDARY – DES

To develop competent beginner professionals who are skilled, committed and insightful and have the subject knowledge, pedagogical skills and general education to promote effective and inclusive learning in secondary schools. (level 7)
The admission to a Diploma requires a minimum score of 22 points in the 5 best school subjects. The following will be taken into consideration when computing the point scores according to the grade evaluation table further on:Be a holder of a Namibian Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary/ Higher or recognised equivalent with a minimum of 22 points in five subjects according to the grade evaluation table. One of the five subjects must be English NSSC Ordinary (English as a Second Language) obtained with a grade C minimum or English as First language with grade D The two school subjects to be selected in the Diploma must also be part of the five subjects of the grade 12 qualification with at least an IGCSE D symbol. OR(b) Meet the requirements of mature age entry which means:A student should be at least 23 years old on the day of registration Should have completed the Namibian Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary/ Higher or recognised equivalent with a minimum of 19 points in the best five subjects One of the five subjects must be English NSSC Ordinary (English as a Second Language) obtained with a grade D minimum The two school subjects to be selected in the Diploma must also be part of the five subjects of the grade 12 qualification with at least an IGCSE D symbol. Has at least 3 years relevant teaching experience (junior or senior secondary) Has a ‘letter of recommendation’ from a management member of the school where h/she is / was teaching to identify the suitability of the candidate as a teacher Submit a personal statement about why s/he wants to become a teacher
Distance mode delivery is supplemented by some Contact classes sessions and vacation school sessions.
Students may complete the DSE in three years, but students may complete this qualification within six years.
Students who have completed this Diploma in Secondary Education would be able to:(1) Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as in academic communication skills and writing conventions.(2) Explain concepts of Information Technology and demonstrate using MS Word, MS Excel, Power Point, the Internet and e-mails, desktop publishing and outline Information Science aspects.(3) Analyse important aspects of adolescent development and learning and its implications for teachers.(4) Examine the development of morals, values, religious identity and the beliefs and practices of various religions as well as teaching-learning aspects of secondary RME.(5) Clarify theoretical aspects and practical skills in Art, Music, Dance and Drama as well as teaching-learning aspects of it.(6) Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 8-10.(7) Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in life skills and render inclusive learner support.(8) Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education, selected historical figures, aspects of international and Namibian secondary education and compare the education systems of selected countries.(9) Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and classroom management skills to support junior and senior secondary learners’ learning in different subject areas.(10) Examine the content and application of two selected school subjects, ordinary level.(11) Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 11-12.(12) Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different learning activities and methods.(13) Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons over 16 weeks.(14) Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management.(15) Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.(16) Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals, as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.(17) Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics and remedial Learner Support for two selected school subjects.(18) Examine physiology and fitness issues, gymnastic exercises, athletes training and management of sport events, sport skills and rules, games and dance activities, health promotion issues and teaching methodology aspects.(19) Evaluate the use of educational resources and technologies in different subjects, its role in inclusive education and assessment, the management of classroom media and resource centres and the use of peer tutoring in schools.(20) Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal.(21) Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps, evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.(22) Discuss reading process theories, the development role of literature for adolescent learners, how to teach effective reading, assess reading materials and support secondary learners’ reading.(23) Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school.These outcomes are supportive of employment as junior and senior secondary teachers in the Namibian private or public sector and allows for awarding of a level 7 Diploma in Secondary Education.
                                             (NQF Level 7, 370 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
YEAR 1  (112 credits)    SEMESTER 1  (58 credits)
 English and Academic Communication Skills 1 Clarify and demonstrate general and academic English proficiency in listening, reading, speaking and correct use of grammar.  120  12????  5 C in English gr 12, OrdinaryOr equivalent proof 
 Computer Literacy 1 Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate how to create files and manage documents with the MS Word programme as well as how to locate and analyse information sources.  100 10 2 None
  Learner Development and Learning  Analyse important aspects of adolescent development and learning and its implications for teachers.   120  12  7  None
 Religious and Moral Education  Examine the development of morals, values, religious identity and the beliefs and practices of various religions as well as teaching-learning aspects of secondary RME. 120 12 5 None
 Art, Music, Dance and Drama  Clarify theoretical aspects and practical skills in Art, Music, Dance and Drama as well as teaching-learning aspects of it. 120 12 5 None
Total hours and credits  580 58
 
SEMESTER 2  (54 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
 English and Academic Communication Skills 2 Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in grammar, different types of writing as well as in academic writing conventions.  120  12  5  Module 1
 Computer Literacy 2 Explain theoretical aspects and demonstrate using MS Excel, Power point, the Internet, e-mails, desktop publishing and outline Information Science aspects. 100 10 2 Module 1
 Life Skills 1  Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 8-10. 100 10 5 None
 Counselling and Learner Support 1 Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in Life Skills and render inclusive learner support.  120  12  7 Module of ‘Learner Development and Learning’
 Educational Foundations 1 Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education, selected historical figures, aspects of international and Namibian secondary education and compare the education systems of selected countries.  100 10 7 None
Total hours and credits 540 54
 
YEAR 2:  (136 credits)  SEMESTER 3(62 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
 Classroom Teaching and Management Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and secondary learners’ learning in different subject areas. 140 14 7 None
 School Subject 1 (SS 1,Module 1) Examine the content and application of a selected school subject. 160 16 6 D in Gr 12
 Life Skills 2 Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 11-12. 120 12 5 None
 Teaching-learningResources 1 Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different learning activities and methods. 100 10 7 None
 School-Based StudiesPhase 1 Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons. 1004 weeks in SecondarySchool  10 7 Classroom Teaching and Management
Total hours and credits 620 62
 
YEAR 2:  SEMESTER 4 (74 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
 School Subject 1 (SS 1,Module 2) Examine the content and application of a selected school subject. 160 16 6 Passed Mod 1 of SS 1
 Educational Management Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management. 120 12 7 None
 Assessment & Evaluation Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents. 120 12 7 None
 Inclusive Education andSpecific Difficulties Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals, as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children. 100 10 7 None
 Subject Didactics and Learner Support for SS 1 Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics for the first selected school subject. 140 14 7 Passed SS 1, Mod 1 & 2
 School-Based StudiesPhase 2 Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons. 1004 weeks in SecondarySchool  10 7 PassedSBS phase 1
Total hours and credits 740 74
 
YEAR 3:  (122 credits)  SEMESTER 5 (58 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
 School Subject 2 (SS 2,Module 1) Examine and apply the content of a second selected school subject. 160 16 6 D in Gr 12
 Physical Education  Examine physiology and fitness issues, gymnastic exercises, athletes training and management of spot events, sport skills and rules, games and dance activities, health promotion issues and teaching methodology aspects. 100 10 5 None
 Teaching-learningResources 2 Evaluate the use of educational resources and technologies in different subjects, its role in inclusive education and assessment, the management of classroom media and resource centres and the use of peer tutoring in schools. 100 10 8 Passed Module 1
 Educational Research Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal. 120 12?????? 7 None
 School-Based StudiesPhase 3 Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons. 1004 weeks in SecondarySchool  10 7 PassedSBS Phase 2
Total hours and credits 580 58
 
YEAR 3:  SEMESTER 6 (64 credits)
 Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQFCredits NQFlevel Pre-requisite
 School Subject 2 (SS 2,Module 2) Examine and apply the content of a second selected school subject. 160 16 6 Passed SS 2 Mod 1
  Curriculum Studies  Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps, evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.  120  12  7  None
 Adolescent Literature and Reading Support Discuss the reading process theories, the development role of literature for learners, how to teach effective reading, assess reading materials and support learners’ reading. 80 8 7 None
 Subject Didactics and Learner Support for SS 2 Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics for the second selected school subject. 140 14 7 Passed SS 2,Module 1 & 2
 Basic First Aid Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school. 30 3 4 None
 School-Based StudiesPhase 4 Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons. 1104 weeks in SecondarySchool  11 7 PassedSBS phase 3
Total hours and credits 640 64
 (a)  A reasonable workload for Namibian higher education full time students is between 60 and 65 credits or between 5 and 6 modules per semester. A module with 2 periods / teaching hours per week for a semester (of 14 weeks) typically counts 8 credits in the UNAM context. Student learning hours or Notional hours are estimated at slightly more than double the teaching hours since it includes individual learning, face-to-face sessions, practical work and doing assignments for a semester mark. The national hours (or number of periods per week) allocated to a subject / module are guided by the weight that the National Professional Standards for Teachers in Namibia (NPST) allocate to a standard.  Each credit requires ten notional hours. Thus a 10 credit subject requires 100 hours of learning.(b)   This programme comprises of 6 semesters and 370 credits with a grade 12 admission of 22 points scored for the best five subjects according to the points table.(c)    Of the 370 credits, a total of 193 credits are on level 7 which is 121credits more than the NQF requirement of 72 credits on the level of certification. Of the 370 credits 10 credits are on level 8,  (Teaching-learning Resources 2). Sixty four (64) credits are on level 6; 80 on level 5; 3 credits on level 3 and 20 credits on level 2.The ‘school subject / learning area’ content oriented credits (SS1 and 2, 50% of credits of 2 x Subj. Didactics, English and Academic Com. Skills, Computer Literacy, RME, Life Skills 1 and 2, Physical Education, Art, Music and Drama, First Aid, Children’s Literature and Reading Support and 50% of credits of School-based studies) totals 210 credits and the ‘professional oriented’ credits totals 160.   This roughly represents a credits ratio of 54% subject content and 46% professional skills.  The bottom line is that this Secondary Diploma pays a balanced attention to the occupational roles and graduate requirements as indicated by the ‘Situation analysis’ Section.(d)   As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggested, the curriculum addresses ‘English language proficiency; adequate subject content and teaching methodology of it; learning support and quality assurance via proper admission criteria and required credits and levels.  In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘good governance’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to, e.g. see the module descriptors and Section 7 on Assessment Policy and Section 9 on Quality assurance and accreditation.(e)   Some observations in terms of the broad structure of the programme are:  The National Professional Standards for Teachers are adhered to in modules. The basics of several level 8 specialisations are covered in this Diploma in Secondary Education, e.g. Classroom Teaching and Management and Assessment and Evaluation form the basis for the IOL level 8  Teaching and Assessment Mentoring, while Educational Management prepares students for School Leadership and ManagementCurriculum Studies prepare students for Curriculum Theory and Practices. In addition, the foundation is laid for level 8 Research and Counselling and Learner Support 2.(f)     Unwritten policy requires secondary teachers to be able to teach in two school subjects, therefore this Diploma prescribe the selection of two school subjects and their methodologies. The 9 options of selected major school subjects for this Diploma include: English, Mathematics, Geography, History, Business Studies, Computer Studies, Economics, Accounting, Afrikaans and Biology which cover some of the scarce subjects in Namibia. Diploma students should be able to teach on the grade 12 Ordinary level which is the greater need after the 2015 changes to the secondary curriculum.(g)    The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum to support the tempo of completing the Diploma: Enrolment for ‘Counselling and Learner Support’ in the second semester requires a pass of ‘Learner Development and Learning’ in the first semester. English and Academic Communication Skills, Computer Literacy, Teaching-learning Resources 2 require a pass in module 1 to proceed with module 2. Classroom Teaching and Management is a prerequisite for doing School-based Studies and the two school subjects must be passed before their Subject Didactics and Learner Support can be enrolled for.(h)    As the module descriptors later on reflects, the Subject Didactics incorporate teaching-learning methods, media and national subject syllabus assessment aspects as well as remedial learning support in the school subject. Subject Didactics also include ‘subject file’ management as part of instructional management.  NIED approved textbooks which secondary teachers must use in schools, are also prescribed.(i)    The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. subject knowledge and the didactics of it. The Subject Didactics encompasses also the LCE paradigm as advocated in Namibia. The CBE quality perspective of ‘meeting purposefully designed standards’ is adhered to.(j)   The module titles of the curriculum reflect the rationale and exit learning outcomes and a CBE systematic ‘design down’ is also observable.(k)   The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop skills is emphasised.  Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. The professional modules include studying the relevant Namibian education policies and NIED compiled documents.(l)    The School-Based Studies (SBS) should be done in a secondary school since the focus of the Diploma is on junior and senior secondary education. The proposed 4 School-based phases of 4 weeks each (16 weeks) are requiring doing of observations and interactions with teachers and learners to execute the given assignments which correlate with the subjects enrolled for in the foregoing period of time. The final grading score for each SBS phase is calculated by a 60% passing in each of the components of:  assignments, lesson preparations and lesson presentations.(m)  The Diploma incorporates international trends in higher education, such as the development of occupational competence; the ability to use ICT; awareness of HIV/AIDS; responsiveness to local educational needs; co-operation rather than competition between people; integration of disciplinary knowledge into some modules and sound management theories for personal and national school efficiency and effectiveness.
Assessment policies and procedures are impacting on whether high standards are attained or not. Low standards of education do neither individuals nor schools or the country any favors.Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and the length of assignments increases for subjects worth more than 8 credits, e.g. 120 marks for modules of 10-12 credits and 140 marks for modules of 14-16 credits. The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for an 8 credits module, the paper is 2 hours for 100 marks; for an 10-12 credits module, the paper is two and a half hours for 120 marks; for an 14-16 credits module, the paper is 3 hours for 140 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers it is spelled out in the particular module.A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations. A 60% pass is required for practical work and such work could account for 50% of the semester mark. The 60% pass applies to School-based Studies as well.Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills account for 60% of the paper marks; higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 30% and very high levels of thinking (evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks. Re-submission of assignments is permissible, but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before writing the examination.Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination. A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination. Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Students can qualify with a 45 – 49% in an examination for a supplementary examination. If a student qualifies for a supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees. If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam. The School-Based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of ‘lesson preparations’ and the third of ‘lesson presentations’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. An appointed IOL assessor visit schools and assess students’ lesson presentations in order to monitor the validity of the lesson presentation scores awarded by teachers. Tutors / lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement. English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses could be certified separately.The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the DSE over 6 years. This time factor determines how many subjects per semester and year must be passed to complete the course within 6 years. Students could in future receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION – POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA – DE

To develop competent beginner professionals who are skilled, committed and insightful who has subject knowledge, pedagogical skills and general education to promote effective and inclusive learning in secondary schools and could continue with an IOL Level 8 qualification (Level 7).
Be a holder of a recognised B.Degree worth 360 credits, the degree should contain 2 school subjects, both up to Level 6-4 semesters. Submit a ‘letter of recommendation’ from a management member of a school to confirm the suitability of the candidate as a secondary teacher.
Distance mode supplemented by Contact Classes and vacation school session
DE is a 1 year and a half qualification for which IOL students have three (3) years to complete the qualification.
  1. Analyse important aspects of adolescent development and learning and its implications for teachers.
  2. Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and classroom management skills to support junior and senior secondary learners’ learning in different subject areas.
  3. Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education, selected historical figures, aspects of international and Namibian educational developments over time and  compare historical developments among selected countries.
  4. Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 8-12.
  5.  Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in life skills and render inclusive learner support.
  6. Examine the development of morals, values, religious identity and the beliefs and practices of various religions as well as teaching-learning aspects of secondary RME.
  7. Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different learning activities and methods.
  8. Explain and apply the theories of Subject Didactics and remedial Learner Support for two selected school subjects.
  9. Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management.
  10. Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.
  11. Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons over 8 weeks.
  12. Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals, as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.
  13. Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps, evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.
  14. Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal.
  15. Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school.
 These outcomes are supportive of employment as junior and senior secondary teachers in the Namibian private or public sector and allows for awarding of a level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Secondary Education.
Diploma in Education Curriculum (NQF Level 7, 201 credits)
Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
YEAR 1  (140 credits)    SEMESTER 1  (70 credits)
Learner Development and LearningAnalyse important aspects of adolescent development and learning and its implications for teachers.120127None
Classroom Teaching and ManagementEvaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and secondary learners’ learning in different subject areas. 140 14 7 None
Educational Foundations 1 Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education, selected historical figures, aspects of international and Namibian secondary education and compare the education systems of selected countries.100107None
Religious and Moral Education Examine the development of morals, values, religious identity and the beliefs and practices of various religions as well as teaching-learning aspects of secondary RME.120125None
 Life Skills 1  Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 8-10. 100 10 5 None
Counselling and Learner Support 1Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in Life Skills and render inclusive learner support.120127Module of ‘Learner Development and Learning’
Total hours and credits700 70
 
SEMESTER 2  (70 credits)
Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
Teaching learning Resources 1 Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different learning activities and methods.100107None
Subject Didactics and Learner Support for SS 1Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics for the first selected school subject.140147SS 1 in degree on level 6
Assessment & EvaluationDebate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.120127None
Educational ManagementAppraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning; management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management.120127None
Life Skills 2Examine the content and teaching methodology of a range of life skills for grade 11-12.120125 None
School-Based Studies Phase 1Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.1004 weeks in Secondary School 107Classroom Teaching and Management
Total hours and credits700 70
 
YEAR 2:  SEMESTER 1  (61 credits)
Module Title Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
Subject Didactics and Learner Support for SS 2Examine and apply the theories of Subject Didactics for the second selected school subject.140147SS 2 in degree on level 6
Inclusive Education and Specific DifficultiesEvaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals, as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.100107None
Curriculum Studies Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps, evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.120127None
Educational ResearchAnalyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and write a research proposal.120127None
Basic First AidOutline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school.3034None
School-Based Studies Phase 2Execute specified secondary school-based observation tasks covering the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.1004 weeks in Secondary School 107Passed SBS phase 1
Total hours and credits61061
 
Assessment PolicyThis assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and second opportunity exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules. Assessment policies and procedures are impacting on whether high standards are attained or not. Low standards of education do neither individuals nor schools or the country any favors.Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and the length of assignments increases for subjects worth more than 8 credits, e.g. 120 marks for modules of 10-12 credits and 140 marks for modules of 14-16 credits. The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for an 8 credits module, the paper is 2 hours for 100 marks; for an 10-12 credits module, the paper is two and a half hours for 120 marks; for an 14-16 credits module, the paper is 3 hours for 140 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers it is spelled out in the particular module. A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations. A 60% pass is required for practical work and such work could account for 50% of the semester mark. The 60% pass applies to School-based studies as well. Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills count for 50% of the paper marks; higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 40% and very high levels of thinking (evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks. Re-submission of assignments is permissible, but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before writing the examination. Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination. A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination. Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Students can qualify with a 45 – 49% in an examination for a supplementary examination. If a student qualifies for a supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees. If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam. The School-Based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of ‘lesson preparations’ and the third of ‘lesson presentations’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. An appointed IOL assessor visit schools and assess students’ lesson presentations in order to monitor the validity of the lesson presentation scores awarded by teachers. Tutors / lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement. English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses could be certified separately. The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the 17 modules of the Postgraduate Diploma over 6 semesters. This time factor determines thus that a student must complete a minimum of 3 modules per semester. Students could in future receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION: SENIOR PRIMARY – BESP

The rationale for the proposed new level 8 Senior-primary Degree qualification is to offer a four year Namibian designed, teacher education qualification in an area where teachers are in great demand to address the government drive in providing quality primary education across Namibia and to develop skilled, committed and insightful professionals who have the subject knowledge and pedagogical skills to promote effective and inclusive learning in Senior primary schools (Level 8).
To qualify for admission to the ‘Degree in Senior-primary Education’ an applicant shall satisfy any one of the following minimum requirements (a) OR (b) OR (c):(a)   The admission to a degree requires a minimum score of 23 points in the 5 best school subjects of the grade 12 certificate. The following will be taken into consideration when computing the point scores according to the grade evaluation table further on:
  • Be a holder of a Namibian Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary / Higher or recognised equivalent with a minimum of 25 points in five subjects according to an admission evaluation scale.
  • One of the five subjects must be English NSSC Ordinary (English as a Second Language) obtained with a grade C minimum or English as First language with grade D.
  • Another two of the five best subjects must provide a relevant basis for the two major subjects to be selected in the degree and passed at a grade C ordinary at least.
  • It is recommendable that another one of the five best subjects is a Mother Tongue.
OR(b)   Meet the requirements of mature age entry which means:
  • A student should be at least 23 years old on the day of registration
  • Should have successfully completed junior secondary education
  • Should have at least 3 years of relevant teaching experience
  • Submit a ‘letter of recommendation’ from a management member of the school where h/she was teaching to identify the suitability of a candidate as a teacher
  • Submit proof taht the student is currently teaching his/her major subjects for Grade 5 – 7 for a minimum period of 3 years.
OR(c)   General admission regulations that apply to both the above admission options:
  • Places will be awarded on the basis of merit in the case of over subscription.
  • IOL reserves the right to conduct further admission tests such as interviews or aptitude tests.
The senior-primary learning areas involve the following:
  • English (7 periods per week)
  • Another language / Mother Tongue (6)
  • Mathematics (7)
  • Natural Science and Health (5)
  • Social Studies (5)
  • One of: Design and Technology/ Elementary Agriculture/ Home Ecology (3)
  • Arts (music, dance, drama, visual art, (2)
  • Physical education (1)
Distance with a combination Contact Classes via LYNC and vacation school sessions.
This is a four year qualification bit IOL Candidates may use eight years to complete this qualification.
Students who have completed this degree, would be able to:(1)   Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in listening, reading, speaking and correct use of grammar.(2)   Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate how to create files and manage documents with the MS Word programme as well as how to locate and analyse information sources.(3)   Discuss issues regarding the development of learners’ religious identity, emotional intelligent social behaviour, Jewish faith, Life Skills and methods to teach this.(4)   Explain issues regarding physical and social health, gender characteristics and features and the importance of sunlight, water, soil and air on earth, features of plants, animals and humans, matter and ecosystems and teaching methodology aspects.(5)   Explain the forms and levels of language learning, discuss theories of language development in learners and explain issues of developing learners’ listening skills and teaching methodology.(6)   Explain features of maps, the Namibian natural environment, rainfall and natural vegetation, sources of historical information, early community life and later changes, Namibia under foreign rule, elements of the Namibian government system, natural resources and economic activities of Namibia, communication technology, HIV/AIDS and methodology to teach these to grade 5 learners.(7)  Interpret data and explain operations with whole numbers, common and decimal fractions, time, money and solving problems with length, mass and two and three dimensional shapes as well as methods to teach and assess such content.(8)  Illustrate and clarify theories, principles and the value of visual art in primary settings and demonstrate skills to draw, build models, do constructing and collage work and explain aspects of teaching and assessing art creations.(9)   Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in grammar, different types of writing as well as in academic writing conventions.(10) Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate using the Internet and e-mails as well as managing files to create documents with MS Excel and Powerpoint.(11) Discuss issues regarding aspects of ‘human community’, African traditions and religions,  aspects of Christianity and the teaching of selected Life Skills.(12) Explain features of physical, emotional and social development, self-esteem and emotions, scientific processes, of sunlight, matter and forces, water wind and magnets, plants, animals and human body systems and how to teach these to upper primary learners.(13) Explain issues and teaching methods and activities for improving learners’ speaking and reading as well as issues of teaching and assessing language development.(14) Explain the reading of maps, historical changes and governing of countries in Southern Africa, physical features, climatic, natural vegetation and population distribution of Africa, economic development and cultural features, fighting HIV / AIDS and teaching methodology aspects.(15) Interpret data and explain operations with whole numbers, common and decimal fractions, time, money and solving problems with length, mass and two and three dimensional shapes as well as methods to teach and assess such content.(16) Examine theoretical music and drama perspectives, how to involve learners in music and drama learning activities, express artistic opinions assertively and stage a live music and acting performance in the school.(17) Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.(18) Analyse important theories and aspects of upper primary learner development and learning  and its implications for teachers.(19) Evaluate and apply concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support upper primary learners’ learning in different subject areas.(20) Explain sexual health related topics, features of planets, matter, lights, electricity, plants and animals, ecosystems and -components as well as systems of the human body and teaching methodology issues regarding these topics.(21) Explain some language elements underpinning writing, some basic and transactional writings as well as teaching and assessing writing.(22) Explain aspects of living in global and local neighbourhoods, civilisation developments, map reading and world geography features, the role of technology in modern life, national development factors, the international fight against HIV /AIDS and teaching methodology issues regarding these topics.(23) Interpret data and explain operations with whole numbers, common and decimal fractions, time, money and solving problems with length, mass and two and three dimensional shapes as well as methods to teach and assess such content.(24) Evaluate issues and the role of educational resources in communication as well as learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ primary classroom media in lessons with different strategies and methods.(25) Evaluate the importance and contributions of History and Comparative Education and selected historical perspectives regarding international and Namibian formal senior-primary education and compare the senior-primary education systems of selected countries.(26) Explain physiology and fitness issues, gymnastic exercises, athletes training and management of sport events, sport skills and rules, games and dance activities, health promotion issues and teaching methodology aspects.(27) Explain some features of matter, features of ionic and metallic bonding, types, properties and uses of materials, environmental chemistry, composition, uses and pollution of air, features of water, matter, power and mechanics, features of energy, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound and light and explain some methodology aspects.(28) Explain characteristics of written and visual literature, analyse novels, dramas and poetry and explain how to teach it.(29) Explain the development of Namibian nationalism, South African colonial administration, role of the church before independence, events prior to independence, the African struggle for independence and economic development, developments of world history in the 20th century, read maps and weather data, explain Namibian ecology, regional geography and population geography and aspects of geomorphology.(30) Solve number problems involving direct and indirect proportions, do calculations with money, volume and surface areas, perform different geometric calculations, perform algebraic operations,  draw function graphs,  draw and interpret histograms and calculate probability and solve trigonometry problems in right-angled triangles.(31) Explain the importance of agriculture to families and enterprises, importance of soil, water and light for plant growth, how to deal with plant diseases and pests and weeds, taking care of farm animals and teaching methodology aspects.(32) Describe the importance of safety precautions, aspects of business and job opportunities, technology, design and energy concepts, practice sketching and drawing and describe some teaching methodology aspects.(33) Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.(34) Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative and quantitative research types, how to gather and analyse data and the structure of a research proposal.(35) Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals    as well as  causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.(36) Discuss some issues regarding speed, mass and density, pressure and thermal physics, and properties of waves, light and sound, electricity and electromagnetism, practical electric circuitry and nuclear physics.(37) Explain foundational issues about grammar and its teaching, the use of different parts of speech and upper primary teaching and assessment activities for it.(38) Discuss and apply geographical features, including plate tectonics, formation of land- and marine forms, water, atmospheric processes, ecosystems, soil formation and soil types, topographical maps, geographical enquiry skills, population dynamics, agricultural and industrial systems, tourism industry and resources.(39) Explain and do calculations with numbers, algebraic representation, formulae, indices and manipulations, do calculations of polynomials, explain and apply logarithms and sequences theory and draw and interpret graphs.(40) Explain the food production and economic role of agriculture in Namibia, production issues, vegetable and poultry production and marketing, money management and teaching methodology aspects.(41) Explain safety precautions, business and entrepreneurial aspects, different features of materials, application of energy and electricity in work, elements of design and drawing and aspects of teaching methodology.(42) Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.(43) Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps and evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia.(44) Select a topic and create a research proposal.(45) Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning: management functions, concepts and styles, management skills, the school as an organisation, financial management, management of health and safety and personnel management.(46) Analyse theories and demonstrate skills of counselling and rendering inclusive learner support.(47) Analyse experimental techniques, characteristics of atoms, elements, molecules and compounds, bonding, stoichiometry, production of energy, energetics, characteristics of acids,bases and salts, the Periodic Table, properties of metals,  the organic chemistry and structure of compounds and the application and dangers of chemistry(48) Analyse features of sentences such as phrases, clauses, prepositions, direct and indirect speech  and figures of speech.(49) Discuss international peace treaties (1919 – 1923) and relationships (before 1939), the Cold War,the UNO, Namibian history from 1884 – 1990, political developments in South Africa (since 1948) and Southern Africa, the Nazi Party rule of Germany (1934-1945), USA between 1914 – 1941, Western Imperialism in some African countries and skills for historians.(50) Explain function notation and linear programming, coordinate geometry, use geometrical terms, facts and applications, calculate angles in triangles, analyse data, calculate probability and geometrical transformations and vectors.(51) Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.(52) Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons(53) Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education as disciplines and the features and impact of some sociological aspects, including educational laws, and selected philosophical schools of thought on schooling.(54) Evaluate counselling theories, modern life influences on wellbeing, approaches in individual and group counselling, functions and skills of the counselling process, crisis interventions, interventions for underachievers and for social issues and career counselling.(55) Execute the draft proposal of the research project for phase 1.(56) Analyse learning support of issues about the teaching-learning of grammar, speaking, reading, writing, prose, poetry and assessment.(57) Discuss theories and apply activities about supporting the learning of upper primary learners’ learning across a range of Natural Science and Health topics.(58) Discuss theories and apply activities about supporting the learning of upper primary learners’ learning across a range of Social Studies topics, including History, Geography and HIV/AIDS.(59) Discuss theories and apply activities about supporting the learning of upper primary learners’ learning of Mathematics including topics such as key issues underpinning learning support, the mathematics environment and issues of assessment in mathematics.(60) Evaluate key teaching and assessment and evaluation issues, mentoring purposes, areas and models, mentoring roles and activities and effective skills for coaching and mentoring.(61) Evaluate theories and practices of school management and leadership including a culture and climate of teaching and learning, organisational conflict and change, stress, planning,  organising, control, problem solving/ decision making and motivation of staff.(62) Evaluate the contribution of Philosophy and educational philosophies towards curriculum development, evaluate ideologies, critique curriculum design models and propose an ideal role of schools in their communities.(63) Explain issues of language in society, ways to develop listening, speaking, reading, writing and grammar structural issues, vocabulary as well as methods to teach these components.(64) Argue issues of the Namibian teaching profession, professionalism, development issues as well as activities and evaluate the community development roles of professionals, the development of one’s emotional intelligence (EI) and job searching and entrepreneurial skills.(65) Analyse learning support of issues about the teaching-learning of grammar, speaking, reading, writing, prose, poetry and assessment.(66) Evaluate reading processes and theories, the developmental role of literature for learners and how to teach and assess reading materials and reading programmes and support learners’ reading.(67) Evaluate the use of educational resources and technologies in different subjects, its role in inclusive education and assessment, the management of classroom media and resource centres and the use of peer tutoring in schools.(68)  Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in a school.(69) Discuss how to create a coaching / mentoring culture in school, mentoring and performance management, applications of mentoring, international research findings about mentoring and evaluate the success of a mentoring system.(70) Discuss theories and practices of school management and leadership: School communication, negotiation, harmonious relations, staff recruitment and development, administration, financial management, instructional management and community involvement.(71) Discuss Namibian curriculum implementation issues, the curriculum role of teachers, propose the design and implementation of a thinking skills programme across the upper primary curriculum, discuss the evaluation of programmes and evaluate learner and learning issues that influence curriculum implementation.(72) Explain some theory, practices and management of plant production, sheep / goat farming, fish farming and teaching methodology aspects.(73) Explain conservation measures and safety precautions, features of design and design communication, features of and how to work with materials, aspects of hydraulic and pneumatic mechanisms; application of energy and aspects of teaching methodology.
The curriculum framework for this NQF level 8 Degree (comprising 543 credits) is as follows:Table 11: IOL Senior-Primary Curriculum Framework (Level 8 /Honours, 543 credits)Year 1:   semester  1  (70  credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 English and Academic Communication  Skills 1  Clarify and demonstrate general and academic English proficiency in listening, reading, speaking and correct use of grammar.   120 12 5 Admission C in NSSC English
 Computer  Literacy 1  Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate how to create files and manage documents with the MS Word programme as well as how to locate and analyse information sources.    100 10 2  none
 Life Orientation and LifeSkills 1 Discuss issues regarding the development of learners’ religious identity, emotional   intelligent social behaviour, Jewish faith, Life Skills and methods to teach this.  120 12 5 None
 Major school Subject 1 and 2Select one option of:·    Natural Science and Health 1+  English1   OR·    Social Science 1  +  English 1OR·    Mathematics 1  + English 1OR·      Mathematics 1  + Natural    Science and Health 1      Explain  the content  and  teaching methodology  of  two  selected  school  subjects   140140   1414   55    See admission regulations: mostly a C grade required 
 Support  subjectVisual Art Illustrate and clarify theories, principles and skills to draw, build models, do constructing and collage work and examine aspects of teaching-learning and assessing art creations.  100????? 10???? 5 None
Total  70070  
 Year 1: semester 2   (70 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 English and Academic Communication  Skills 2  Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in grammar, different types of writing as well as in academic writing conventions.    120 12 5 Module 1
 Computer Literacy 2 Explain theoretical aspects and demonstrate using MS Excel, Power point, the Internet, e-mails, desktop publishing and outline Information Science aspects.  100 10 2 Module 1
 Life Orientation and LifeSkills 2 Discuss issues regarding aspects of ‘human community’, African traditions and religions,   aspects of Christianity and the teaching of selected Life Skills.  120 12 5 None
 Major school Subject 1 and 2Select one option of:·    Natural Science and Health 2+  English 2   OR·    Social Science 2  + English 2OR·    Mathematics 2  + English 2OR·      Mathematics 2  + Natural    Science and Health 2      Explain   the content  and  teaching methodology  of  two  selected  school  subjects    140140    1414    55     Module 1 of each major
 Support  subjectMusic, Dance and Drama Examine theoretical music and drama perspectives, how to involve learners in music and drama learning activities, express artistic opinions assertively and stage a live music and acting performance in the school.   100????? 10 6  None
Total 700 70  
  Year 2:  semester 1  (60 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 School Based StudiesPhase 1 Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons. 80(4 weeks)  8 5  None
 Learner Development  and Learning Analyse important aspects of adolescent development and learning and its implications for teachers.  120 12 7  None
 Classroom Teaching and Management Evaluate and apply understanding of concepts, teaching-learning principles, strategies, methods and management skills to support junior and senior primary learners’ learning in different subject areas.  140??? 14 7  None
 Major school Subject 1 and 2Select one option of:·    Natural Science and Health 3+  English 3    OR·    Social Science 3  +  English 3OR·    Mathematics 3  + English 3OR·      Mathematics 3  + Natural    Science and Health 3     Explain  the content  and  teaching methodology of two selected  school  subjects    140140    1414    66     Module 2 of each major
Total68068  
  Year 2:  semester 2   (68 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Teaching-learning Resources 1 Evaluate the role of educational resources in communication, learning theories and the use and advantages of ‘traditional’ classroom media in lessons with different strategies and methods.  80 8 7  None
 Educational Foundations 1Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education as disciplines and the features and impact of some sociological aspects, including educational laws, and selected philosophical schools of thought on schooling. 100 10 7  None
 Physical and HealthEducationExplain physiology and fitness issues, gymnastic exercises, athletes training and  management of sport events, sport skills and rules, games and dance activities, health  promotion issues and teaching methodology aspects. 80 8 5 None
 Major school Subject 1 and 2Select one option of:·    Natural Science and Health 4+  English 4    OR·    Social Science 4  +  English 4OR·    Mathematics 4  + English 4OR·      Mathematics 4  + Natural    Science and Health 4      Explain  the content  of  two  selected  school  subjects above grade 7 level    140140    1414    66      Module 3
 Minor elective: select oneAgricultural Education 1     ORDesign  and Technology 1Explain the importance of agriculture and features of soil, water and light , plants, taking care of farm animals and teaching methodology aspects.  ORDescribe the importance of safety precautions, aspects of business and job opportunities,  technology, design and energy concepts, someteaching methodology aspects 80   8   5   None   
 School Based StudiesPhase 2 Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in aparticular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.  80(4 weeks)  8 6 Phase 1
Total68068  
 Year 3:  semester 1 (66 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Educational Research Analyse general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative, quantitative and other research types, how to gather and analyse data and the structure of a research proposal.  120 12 7  None
 Inclusive Education and Specific Difficulties Evaluate and apply models, legislations for protecting the rights of special needs individuals as well as causes, features and techniques of working with different types of special needs children.  100 10 7  None
 Major school Subject 1 and 2Select one option of:·    Natural Science and Health 5+  English 5    OR·    Social Science 5  +  English 5OR·    Mathematics 5  + English 5OR·      Mathematics 5 + Natural    Science and Health 5       Explain  the content  of  two  selected  school  subjects above grade 7 level        140140     1414     77       Module 4
 Minor elective: select oneAgricultural Education 2     ORDesign  and Technology 2 Explain food production and economic role of agriculture , production issues,   marketing, money management and teachingmethodology aspects.   OR Explain safety precautions, business and entrepreneurial aspects,  features of materials,  energy and electricity , elements of design and teaching methodology   80  8  6   Module 1
 School Based StudiesPhase 3 Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in aparticular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.  80(4 weeks) 8 7  Phase 2
Total66066  
  Year 3:  semester 2  (78 credits)
Module Title and CodeComprehensive exit learning outcomesNotionalhoursNQF CreditsNQF levelPre-requisite
 Curriculum Studies Evaluate and interpret curriculum concepts, the development of curriculum science, curriculum foundations, design and implementation steps, evaluate competency-based (CBE) and subject-based (SBE) curricula and propose a career education curriculum for Namibia. 120127None
 Research Project Phase 1  Select a topic and create a research proposal. 80 8 8 Educational Research
  Educational Management Appraise theories and practices of school management that promote effective teaching and learning: management functions, concepts, styles, skills, the school as organisation, financial, health and safety and personnel management    120  12  7   None
 Counselling  and Learner Support 1 Analyse counselling theories and skills, provide counselling in life skills and render inclusive learner support.  120 12 7  Module of Learner Development and Learning
 Major school Subject 1 and 2Select one option of:·    Natural Science and Health 6+  English 6    OR·    Social Science 6 + English 6OR·    Mathematics 6 + English 6OR·      Mathematics 6 + Natural    Science and Health 6      Explain the content  of  two  selected  school  subjects above grade 7 level       140140     1414     77       Module 5
  Assessment and Evaluation Debate theories and practices of assessment and evaluation of learning activities and results, aims, construction and application of assessment tools, evaluate the moderation of tests and examination papers, discuss marking and grading techniques, interpret assessment results statistically and evaluate feedback instruments and reporting assessment results to parents.  120  12  7   None
Total74074 
 Year 4:  semester 1 (70 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 School Based StudiesPhase 4 Execute specified upper primary school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons  100(5 weeks) 10 8 Passed all school subjects in years 1-3 & SBSPhase 3
 Educational Foundations 2 Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education as disciplines and the features and impact of some sociological aspects, including educational laws, and selected philosophical schools of thought on schooling.   100 10 8 None
 Counselling and LearnerSupport  2Evaluate counseling theories, approaches and skills in counseling and career counselling and features of learner support.  100 10 8 Module 1
 Research Project 2 Execute the draft proposal of the research project.  120 12 8Research Project Phase 1
Learning Support in selectedMajor 1Discuss theories and apply activities in support of upper primary learners’ learning in Natural Science and Health, Social Studies and Mathematics  80 8 8 Module 6 of major
Career Specialisation:Select ONE specialisation elective from the list below:·       Teaching and Assessment Mentoring A·       School Leadership and         Management A·       Curriculum Theory and  Practices A  Evaluate theories and practices of teaching and assessment; of school management and leadership  and  of curriculum theory and practices        120     12     8  Classroom T & Assessmt and Evaluation Educ Man  Cur Studies
 Mother Tongue / 1st Language:Select one of:Afrikaans, English, German, Ju’hoansi, KhoeKhoegowab,Oshikwanyama, Oshindonga,Otjiherero, Rukwangali, RumanyoSetswana, Silozi, Thimbukushu   Explain issues of language insociety, ways to develop listening,speaking, reading, writing andgrammar structural issues, vocabulary as well as methods to teach these components.    80  8  5        None     
Total70070  
 Year 4:  semester 2  (61 credits)  
Module Title and CodeComprehensive exit learning outcomesNotionalhoursNQF CreditsNQF levelPre-requisite
 Professional & Community Development Argue issues of the Namibian teaching profession, professionalism, development issues as well as activities and evaluate the community development roles of professionals, the development of one’s emotional intelligence (EI), thinking skills and job searching and entrepreneurial skills.  120 12 8  None
 Learning Support in selectedMajor 2 Analyse learning support of issues about the teaching-learning of grammar, speaking,  reading, writing, prose, poetry and assessment.  80 8 8 Module 6 of major
 Reading Support and Literature Evaluate reading process theories, the developmental role of literature for learners, how  to teach effective reading, assess reading materials and support learners’ reading.  80 8 8  None
 Teaching-learning Resources 2 Evaluate the use of educational resources and technologies in different subjects, its role in inclusive education and assessment, the management of classroom media and resource centres and the use of peer tutoring in schools.  100  10  8   Module 1
 Basic First Aid Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school. 30 3 4 None
 Career Specialisation:Select ONE specialisation elective from the list below:·        Teaching and Assessment     Mentoring B·       School Leadership and         Management B·       Curriculum Theory and   Practices B     Discuss theories and practices of teaching and assessment mentoring; of school management and leadership  and  of curriculum development      120     12     8      Spesialisation Mod Aof each option
 Minor elective: select one Agricultural Education 3     ORDesign  and Technology 3Explain some theory, practices and management of plant production, sheep / goat farming,fish farming and teaching methodology aspects.    ORExplain conservation measures, features of design and designcommunication, features of materials and hydraulic andpneumatic mechanisms; application of energy and aspects of teaching methodology.   80  8  6  Module 2
Total61061 

Clarifications of the curriculum

(a)   Students have mostly 6 modules per semester which carries between 61 and 74 credits.In order for a student to obtain 480 credits for a level 8 qualification, h/she must obtain 120 credits per year. That means the credits per semester must be at about 60. Student learning hours or Notional hours are estimated at slightly more than double the teaching hours since it includes individual learning, face-to-face sessions, practical work and doing assignments for continuous assessment. The notional hours allocated to a subject / module are guided by the weight that the National Professional Standards for Teachers in Namibia (NPST) allocate to a standard.  Each credit requires ten notional hours.(b)  The NQF Degree and level 8 requirements are met. This programme comprises 543 credits which are 67 credits above the NQF minimum requirement of 480. Of the 543 credits a total of 120 credits are on level 8 as required. There is a 55:45% acceptable ratio among school subject content (324 credits) and professional subjects (223 of which 34 credits are for School- based learning). The ratio is however closer to 50:50 if taken into account that the subject content includes Subject Didactics and Learner Support.  (c)  The National prescribed school subjects for the senior-primary such as Mathematics, Natural Science and Health, English, Social Studies, Arts and Physical Education are addressed. In addition, teachers are educated in ‘Life Orientation and Life Skills’ which deals with moral values and life skills development as part of ‘holistic wellness’ personal development and avoidance of a (SBE) too narrow subject content focus.  Mathematics and the other major school subjects incorporate both the prescribed subject content for senior-primary and additional higher content levels in module 4-6, as well as the methodology up to level 7.The professional subjects are on level 7 to 8, and include all key NPST standards.  Counselling and Learner Support, Teaching Learning Resources, Professional and Community Development and Learning Support in a Major are also offered on level 8, apart from the level 8 career specialisation options.(d)  The module titles of the curriculum reflect the rationale and exit learning outcomes and a CBE systematic ‘design down’ is thus observable. The modules of Foundations 1 & 2 cover ‘History of Education, Philosophy of Education, Comparative Education’ and Sociology of Education topics as part of ‘Education Theory’ in the NPST. Namibian indigenous knowledge / facts/ policies / NIED documents are also included in the professional subjects.(e)   The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop skills is emphasised. Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. See for example Educational Management 1 and Professional and Community Development.(f)   As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggested, the curriculum further addresses ‘English language proficiency; ICT literacy; Basic First Aid; Mother Tongue development,  Teaching and School Based Studies and  proper admission criteria. The module ‘Childrens’ literature and Reading Support’ is in line with the National Conference of 2011 perspectives to promote reading among learners. In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘good governance’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to.(g)   The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. subject knowledge and the didactics of it. The Subject Methodologies encompasses also the LCE paradigm as advocated in Namibia. There is Learner Support in Mathematics and Reading to promote a good foundation for primary education. Accurate syllabi / module descriptors for School Based Studies are available to direct students’ experiential learning.(h)  The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum in order not to slow down student progress unnecessary: Enrolment for ‘English and Academic Communication Skills’ in the first semester requires a grade C in English NSSC as part of the admission criteria and its second module in semester 2 requires a pass in the first module. ‘Computer Literacy’ runs over the full year and there is no first semester exam due to the practical nature of the subject.

Assessment Policy

This assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and supplementary exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules.
  • Continuous assessment per semester modules consists of assessment opportunities, like assignments and or practicals, worth 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits; 120 marks for modules of 10 or12 credits and 130 marks for modules of 14 credits.
 *      An aggregate of 50% semester / continuous assessment mark is required for admission to examinations.
  • Where practical work is applicable, a 60% pass is required and such work could account for up to 50% of the continuous assessment mark / semester mark.
  • Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. Thirty percent (30%) of assignments and examination papers should be on a higher order thinking level where marks are allocated to thinking about facts.
  • Re-submission of assignments is permissible at extra costs but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before the examination.
  • Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination.
  • The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. an 8 credits module paper is 2 hours and 100 marks, for 10 or 12 credits a two and a half-hour written examination of 120 marks apply, while a14 credit module examination has a duration of 3 hours and counts 130 marks.
  • A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester / continuous assessment mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination.
  • Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August.  Students can qualify with a 45 - 49% in an examination for a supplementary. May-students can thus write a supplementary in August and the August students that qualify can write a supplementary in November.  If a student qualifies for the supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.
  • If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and at extra cost could sit for the third examination. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam.
  • The School- based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of ‘lesson preparation’ and another of’ lesson presentation’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. The School Based Studies forms, regulations and arrangements must be in place.
  • Lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement.
 *       The practice of providing students with an examination scope before examinations, should merely point out core themes, questions and sections and the format of the examination The ‘given scope’ should NOT promise that the exam paper will only cover the ‘scope’ content. *       English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses should preferably be certified separately (Crebbin recommendation 3.2.3).
  • The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another prior module. IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the Degree over 8 years so it is very difficult to specify the amount of modules per year. A realistic guideline may however be to pass at least 50 % of a prescribed year, since this will then take 8 years to complete the 4-year qualification.
 *       Students receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary (dacum chart) of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

BACHELORS OF EDUCATION HONOURS DEGREE – BEDHONS

Honours degree in Senior Primary or Senior Secondary Education. The rationale for the proposed new level 8 B. Ed Honours qualification is to offer specialisation in a particular professional area to promote quality education as well as preparing teachers for a Masters in Education. This degree contributes to proper national human resources development. Alternatively stated, the overall goal/ rationale of the B. Ed Honours is to develop skilled, committed and insightful professionals who have the subject knowledge and pedagogical skills to promote effective and inclusive learning in upper primary and senior secondary schools as well as preparing teachers for a Masters in Education. (level 8 / honours features)
(a) Be a holder of a recognised level 7 teacher qualification of 360 credits or a holder of a BETD plus an Advanced Certificate on a level 7.(b) Should have at least 1 year of Upper-primary or Senior secondary teaching experience.(c) Submit a ‘letter of recommendation’ from a management member of the school where he/she was teaching to identify the suitability of a candidate as a teacher.
Distance with a combination of telephone and interactive video tutoring and vacation school face-to-face sessions.
Candidates may use a maximum of four years to complete this qualification.
Students who have completed this degree, would be able to:(1)    Discuss policies, theories and content regarding the development of learners’ life skills and career counseling as well as processes to develop these skills.(2)    Evaluate counseling theories, approaches and skills in counseling and career counselling and features of learner support.(3)    Discuss and apply general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative and quantitative research types, how to gather and analyse data and compile a research proposal.(4)   Evaluate key teaching and assessment issues.(5)   Evaluate theories and practices of school management and leadership.(6)   Evaluate the contribution of Philosophy and educational philosophies towards curriculum development.(7)   Select a topic and create a research proposal.(8)   Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education for teachers.(9)   Argue about development issues and activities of the Namibian teaching profession.(10) Examine the use and management of educational technologies and its role in inclusive education and assessment.(11) Evaluate and apply how to create a coaching / mentoring culture in school.(12) Evaluate and apply theories and practices of school management and leadership.(13) Evaluate and apply Namibian curriculum implementation issues.(14) Analyse and apply thinking and emotional intelligent skills to teaching and everyday situations.(15) Execute the draft proposal of the research proposal for phase 1.These outcomes are supportive of employment as senior-primary and senior secondary teachers in the private or public sector and allows for awarding of a level 8 qualification.
Table 11: IOL B. Ed Honours Curriculum Framework (Level 8 /Honours, 126 creditsYear 1:   semester  1  (36  credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Life Skills 3  Discuss  policies, theories and content regarding the development of learners’ life skills and career counseling as well as processes to develop these skills.  120 12 8  None
 Counseling  and LearnerSupport  2 Evaluate counseling theories,  approaches and skills in counseling  and career counselling and features of learner support.  100 10 8 Module 1 of Counseling and Learner Support
  Educational Research 2  Discuss and apply general features regarding research, the characteristics of qualitative and   quantitative research types, how  to gather and analyse data and write a research  proposal.   140  14  8   None(level 7 & 8 are integrated)
Total  36036  
 Year 1: semester 2   (20 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
Career Specialisation:Select ONE  specialisation elective from the list below:·       Teaching and Assessment Mentoring A·       School Leadership and         Management A·       Curriculum Theory and  Practices A     Evaluate theories and practices of teaching and assessment;  of school management and leadership  and  of curriculum theory and practices       120     12     8 Level 7 of:Classroom Teaching & Management  Educ Man-agement Cur Studies
 Research Project Phase 1 Select a topic and create  a research proposal.  80 8 8 Educational Research 2
Total 200 20  
  Year 2:  semester 1  (32 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
 Educational Foundations 2  Deliberate the value of Sociology and Philosophy of Education for teachers.  100 10 8 None
 Professional & Community Development Argue about development issues and activities of the Namibian teaching profession.  120 12 8  None
  Teaching-learning Resources 2 Examine the use and management of educational technologies and its role in inclusive education and assessment.   100  10  8  None
Total32032  
  Year 2:  semester 2   (38 credits) 
 Module Title and Code Comprehensive exit learning outcomes Notional hours NQF Credits NQF level Pre-requisite
Career Specialisation:Select ONE  specialisation elective from the list below:·       Teaching and Assessment Mentoring B·       School Leadership and         Management B·       Curriculum Theory and  Practices B    Evaluate theories and practices of teaching and assessment;  of school management and leadership  and  of curriculum theory and practices         120     12     8    Module Aof these options
 Thinking Skills and Emotional Intelligence Development Analyse and apply thinking and emotional intelligent skills to teaching and everydaysituations.  140 14 8 Learner Dev and Learning 
 Research Project Phase 2 Execute the draft proposal of the research proposal as in phase 1.  120 12 8 Research Project Phase 1
Total38038  
(a)   The 2 year full time distance mode curriculum has 3 modules (+-30 credits) per semester to enhance employed students’ learning success. Thirty credits per semester translate into 300 notional hours over a semester of about 4 months. A student must therefore spend a minimum of 75 hours per month studying or 19 hours per week or 3 hours per day, except Sundays. Student learning hours or notional hours are estimated at slightly more than double the contact teaching hours since it includes individual learning, face-to-face sessions, practical work and doing assignments for continuous assessment. The notional hours allocated to a subject / module, are guided by the weight that the National Professional Standards for Teachers in Namibia (NPST) allocate to a standard.  Each credit requires ten notional hours.(b)  The NQF level 8 requirements are met. This programme comprises 126 credits which are 6 credits above the NQF minimum requirement of 120. Of the 126 credits a total of 32 credits are allocated to Research theory and application which are 2 credits more as required. Twenty –four credits are allocated to a specialisation course over 2 semesters. This professional specialisation is in line with some universities in 5 countries. See Section 1.1.2.  The career specialisation electives cater for differentiation of interests while addressing national educational needs concerning teaching and assessment and leadership and management.(c)  The qualification does not offer specialisation in ‘School subjects’ like some universities as seen in Section 1.1.2,  but does follow the specialisation trend in ‘professional subjects’ that are perceived to be of importance in the Namibian context. In addition, teachers are educated in ‘Life Skills 3’ which deals with moral values and life skills and thinking skills development as part of ‘holistic wellness’ development.  Several other subjects offered as compulsory core avoid a (SBE) too narrow subject content focus.(d)  The module titles of the curriculum reflect the rationale and exit learning outcomes and a CBE systematic ‘design down’ is thus observable. The module of Foundations 2 covers ‘Philosophy of Education, and Sociology of Education topics as part of ‘Education Theory’ like the University of Johannesburg. Namibian indigenous knowledge / facts/ policies are also included in the professional subjects such as Life Skills and Teaching Learning Resources.(e)   The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop skills is emphasised. Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. See for example Life Skills, Thinking Skills and Emotional Intelligence development and Professional and Community Development.(f)   As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggested, the curriculum further addresses ‘learner-centred education’,  and  ‘proper admission criteria’. In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘good governance’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to.(g)   The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. Professional and Community Development and Counseling and Learner Support respectively.(h)  The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum in order not to slow down student progress unnecessary, e.g. no prerequisite for Foundations 2, Professional and Community Development and Teaching-Learning Resources 2.  Educational Research 2 covers both level7 and 8 content. Students selecting the career specialisation in ‘Curriculum Theory and Practices’ must have completed a level 7 ‘Curriculum Studies’.(i)   This B. Ed Honours takes note of international trends in teacher and higher education to  improve the scope and depth of local teacher education and local stakeholder views (including the NQF requirements) are also taken note of, for example: (a) The modules and content of this qualification are correlating with the UNAM ones to promote possible admission to the UNAM Masters in Education degree. (b) It has more modules, namely 12, than most of the other honours qualifications analysed, e.g. North West University has 8, UNISA has 10 and Cape Peninsula has 9 modules. (c) Like Winchester University thinking skills are strongly emphasised. (d) The IOL B. Ed incorporates Counseling like the University of Auckland and Charles Sturt. (e) Educational Research theory and application is on par with international honours qualifications for teachers.
  • Assessment per semester modules consists of assessment opportunities, like assignments and or practicals, worth 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and 120 marks for modules of 10 or12 credits and 130 marks for modules of 14 credits.
 
  • An aggregate of 50% for a semester mark is required for admission to examinations.
 
  • Where practical work is applicable, a 60% pass is required and such work could account for up to 50% of the semester mark.
 
  • Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. Thirty percent (30%) of assignments and examination papers should be on a higher order thinking level where marks are allocated to thinking about facts.
 
  • Re-submission of assignments is permissible at extra costs but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission or marking deadlines before the examination.
 
  • Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination.
 
  • The duration of an examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. an 8 credits module paper is 2 hours and 100 marks, while for 10 or 12 credits modules a two and a half-hour written examination of 120 marks apply. The duration for a 14 credit paper is 3 hours and 130 marks.
 
  • A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination.
 
  • Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August.  Students can qualify with a 45 - 49% in an examination for a supplementary. May-students can thus write a supplementary in August and the August students that qualify can write a supplementary in November.  If a student qualifies for the supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.
 
  • If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and at extra cost could sit for the third examination. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam.
 
  • Lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement.
 
  • The practice of providing students with an examination scope before examinations, should merely point out core themes, questions and sections and the format of the examination The ‘given scope’ should NOT promise that the exam paper will only cover the ‘scope’ content.
 
  • The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another prior module. IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete the Degree over 2-4 years so it is very difficult to specify the amount of modules per year. A realistic guideline may however be to pass at least 4 modules per year to complete the 11 modules over three years or 3 modules per year to complete the 11 modules over 4 years.

DIPLOMA IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION – DECE

The overall goal of the Diploma in Early Childhood Education is to develop skilled, committed and insightful beginners who have the subject knowledge and pedagogical skills to promote effective learning in early childhood settings.The aims of the initial Namibian Ministry of Education Early Childhood Development Certificate curriculum, proposed the following: ECD students are to:❑ Improve knowledge and understanding of how to care for children in their developmental stages, providing a safe nurturing and loving environment for the children;❑ Use available resources constructively, creatively and effectively;❑ Provide national uniformity to the programme followed at ECD centres;❑ Understand the significance of play for a child’s development;❑ Develop a lively, questioning, appreciative and creative intellect;❑ Develop positive self-esteem through social interaction, as well as self-confidence and understanding of the world they live in;❑ Provide for individual needs and aptitudes;❑ Promote and foster the highest moral and ethical values;❑ Develop and enhance respect for, understanding of and tolerance for other peoples’ religions, beliefs, cultures and ways of life;❑ Promote equal opportunities for life-long learning for male and females. (Level 6)
An ‘admission requirements’ section typically spells out the criteria for admission while keeping in mind the balance between ‘access’ and ‘quality’. Admission criteria serve to ensure that students who are admitted possess the abilities to cope with the demands of a programme and thus prevent a waste of personal and institutional time and money. Blank (1982:44-52) proposes that admission prerequisites could encompass the four categories of “Physical traits or Abilities”, “Previously learned Skills”, “Previously learned Knowledge” and “Previously acquired Attitudes”. Some of the prerequisites may be an occupational requirement and some an institutional requirement that aims to ensure successful completion of a programme. The institutional requirements must in turn be commensurate with the NQA admission requirements. Admission criteria as well as admission procedures that might accommodate multiple entry points in terms of time, locality and mode of registration need to be considered. Furthermore, the need for recognition of prior learning, developmental / pre-entry courses and a standardized aptitude test to assess candidates ‘suitability’ for becoming teachers must be considered. Namibia does not have a national ‘dispositions test’ for teachers yet but an ‘application letter’ or a required ‘letter of recommendation’could in the meantime serve to identify the suitability of a candidate.The CBE paradigm requires students to take much responsibility for their learning success and lowering of admission requirements to broaden access for political or financial reasons must be accompanied by bridging / pre-entry courses to develop the necessary self-directed learning skills before being admitted to a programme. Furthermore, learning support via a variety of human and learning resources needs to be in place to enhance student success of attaining the required standards. Students who scored below the required admission requirements should be provided with a foundation or bridging programme which would help them to reach the required levels for admission. Note that such bridging courses do not count towards the credits of a programme.Recognition of prior learningAlthough admission to education institutions could be obtained via mature age entry tests an improved strategy for alternative admission is the recognition of prior learning (RPL). The detailed module descriptor documents of CBE programmes are helpful in this regard. A broad perspective of RPL is presented by Osman and Castle (in Gravett and Geyser, 2004:126-133) via the description of three models of RPL. Their ‘credit exchange model’ involves the recognition of ‘prior accredited learning’; the ‘developmental model’ requires candidates to compile and evaluate their prior learning experiences and the ‘transformational model’ of RPL that requires institutions to recognise informal and experiential learning on their own terms without matching it to academic programmes.Whatever model an institute applies, RPL is meant to allow for alternative ways to gain access or receive credit for some courses. Students with relevant teacher education courses might thus get credit for such courses. Geyser (2001:35) mentions some academic and administrative standards that could ensure quality assurance in RPL and also list some assessment tools like standardised exams, final exams, portfolio reviews and oral and practical tests. Jessup (1991:60-62) has augmented these suggestions with ‘conditions and arrangements’ for doing so and adds to these the following tools: design or manufactured products and certificates or letters of validation that endorse performances and job descriptions.As people change jobs more frequently than in the past, and (developing) countries strive to advance their human resources’ potential, recognition of prior learning will play an increasing “important role in the future” as more adults return to education or change careers (Jessup, 1991:67). RPL in Namibia and IOL is not yet implemented and the system of evaluating the prior qualification is in operation.The design of this Diploma in Early Childhood Education recognises the correlation among access, admission and standard of the programme and therefore the following admission criteria are proposed. To qualify for admission to the ‘Diploma in Early Childhood Education’ an applicant shall satisfy the following minimum requirement: ❑ Be a holder of the IOL level-5 Certificate in Early Childhood Education.General admission regulations that apply to all the above admission options: ❑ IOL reserves the right to conduct further admission tests such as interviews or aptitude tests.
IOL offers most programmes via the distance education mode which broadens the access to tertiary education, because students do not have to move to Windhoek.
The following exit learning outcomes of the proposed IOL Diploma in Early Childhood Education correlate with the sequence of this Diploma’s curriculum. The exit outcomes for the incorporated modules are as follows.Students who have completed this diploma would be able to:(1) Examine the development of grade 2 literacy in listening, speaking, preparatory and incidental reading andpreparatory writing, Mother Tongue language structure,grammar and use.(2) Clarify and demonstrate general English proficiency in grammar, different types of writing as well as in academic writing conventions.(3) Explain concepts of information technology and demonstrate how to create files and manage documents with the MS Word programme as well as how to locate and analyse information sources.(4) Examine theories and practices of early childhood learner care across different areas.(5) Clarify aspects of Namibian culture, infrastructure, economic, civic and geographical features, as well as aspects of the natural environment and methods and materials to teach and assess environmental education content for grade 2 and 3.(6) Examine the value, important aspects and activities of early childhood learners in visual art, music, dancing and drama.(7) Execute specified early childhood school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.(8) Explain theoretical aspects and demonstrate using MS Excel, Power point, the Internet, e- mails, desktop publishing and outline Information Science aspects.(9) Examine the development of morals, values, religious identity and the beliefs and practices of various religions.(10) Analyse early childhood curriculum perspectives, best teaching practices, developing of smart kids, classroom management issues; assessment techniques andprofessional development options.(11) Explain the content, activities, resources and assessment for the development of early childhood preparatory mathematics according to the nine themes of the early childhood curriculum.(12) Examine the development of pre-primary numeracy, the four basic mathematical operations, the measurements of time, length, mass and capacity and teaching methodology aspects.(13) Explain basic physiology issues, games, training of primary athletes, management of sport meetings and several dimensions of sexuality education.(14) Analyse cooperation with parents, management theories and skills, administration documents, personnel management issues and establishing a ‘Thinking Skills School’.(15) Outline first aid theories and provide emergency care as first responder in school.These outcomes are supportive of employment as early childhood assistant teachers in the private or public sector and allows for the awarding of a level- 6 Diploma in Education.
This section typically depicts the complete curriculum per year and semester and includes the core and elective modules, their codes, credits, NQA levels and prerequisites. Such a curriculum overview support the analysis of the weight per module related to the exit outcomes, the amount of expected learning hours per semester, credits and level requirements per module, fees per semester and year, lecturers and materials needed per semester and so forth. Clarifications of the curriculum are also offered to promote accurate understanding of it by all current and future stakeholders.Stakeholders typically need to have an opportunity to evaluate the curriculum and provide input. Apart from international research findings about higher and teacher education and Australian, Hong Kong and Canadian examples of Early Childhood Education qualifications, many local stakeholders such as Regional directors, staff from NIED, early childhood centre principal, Primary school principal Association and a Teachers Union have provided input about the Diploma in Early Childhood Education. The local stakeholders’ input is available in Appendix 3.The curriculum framework reflects the systematic ideas of the rationale and exit outcomes and the workload of the proposed one year programme is challenging.(a) Full time students (enrol for all subjects per semester as set out above) have a workload of 6 modules per semester, plus the School-based training, with a total of 60 in the first and 61 credits in the second semester.Each credit requires ten learning hours. Students could however complete the Diploma over 3 years on a part time basis. That implies enrolling for 2 modules per semester for 6 semesters plus two School-based learning experiences.(b) The NQF Diploma level-6 requirements are met. This programme comprises 122 credits of the level-5 Certificate acquired for admission plus 121 credits in the Diploma year, which are far above the NQF minimum credit requirements of 120. Eighty four of the 121 credits for the Diploma are on level 6 which is 12 credits more than the NQF requirements of 72 credits on the level of certification. More credits than 72 on level-6 implies a higher quality programme. There is a 62:55 credit ratio among school subject content and professional subjectcredits. The almost 50:50 ratio between school subject and pedagogical knowledge is an excellent ratio. (c) The latest 2015 national prescribed curriculum subjects of the early childhood phase cover the Mother Tongue / First language, Numeracy, Environmental Studies, Arts,Religious and Moral Education (including Life Skills), Physical Education and Reading and are addressed in this Diploma. The module titles and content of the Diploma in Early Childhood Education reflect the rationale and exit learning outcomes and a CBE systematic ‘design down’ is thus observable.(d) This Diploma in Early Childhood Education is designed to build upon the IOL level-5 Certificate and therefore the level-5 Certificate is the admission requirement for this Diploma. This way mobility between qualifications is promoted.(e) Namibian indigenous circumstances and policies are addressed and available NIED documents for teachers are prescribed in the professional subjects, e.g. ‘The manual for pre-primary teachers’ and NIED approved school textbooks are also prescribed for the Diploma students.(f) The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop teaching, learner support and administration skills is emphasised. Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. See for example, ‘Religious andMoral Education, ‘Early Childhood Learner Care’,‘Environmental Education 2’ and ‘Early Childhood School Management’.(g) As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggest the Early Childhood Education curriculum further addresses ‘English language proficiency; Mother Tongue Development and Literacy and proper admission criteria. The module ‘Early Childhood School Management’ promotes good governance of schools. In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘ICT’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to.(h) The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. subject knowledge and the didactics of it. The Subject Didactics encompasses also the LCE paradigm as advocated in Namibia, as is demonstrated by all the modules, e.g. ‘Early Childhood Learner Care, and ‘Early Childhood Teaching and Assessment’.(i) The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum in order not to slow down student progress unnecessary: Only one module ‘School-Based Studies phase 2’ requires a pass in School-Based Studies phase 1.(j) The Diploma incorporates furthermore local and international trends in higher education, such as the development of occupational competence as well as citizenship; the importance of ICT; responsiveness to local needs; co-operation rather than competition between teachers; awareness of HIV/AIDS and other global issuesand the combination of purposefully selected disciplinary knowledge into modules.
This full time level 6 diploma is offered over 1 year via distance with a combination of telephone tutoring, some subject DVD’s and vacation school face-to-face sessions. Distance candidates may use 3 years to complete this qualification on a part time basis.
This assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and second opportunity exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules. Assessment policies are reflecting the promotion of high or low standards of education and is therefore very important. Low standards of education do neither individuals nor the country any favors. ❑ Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and 1 assignment of 120 marks for modules worth 10 or12 credits. ❑ A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations. ❑ Where practical work is applicable, a 60% pass is required and such practical work could account for 50% of the semester mark. This applies to School-Based Studies as well.❑ Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills count for 70%; Higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 20% and very high levels (of evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks.❑ Re-submission of assignments is permissible at extra costs but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission deadlines before writing the examination. ❑ Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination. ❑ The duration of the examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for 10 or12 credits modules the examination is typical 1 x two and a half-hour written examination of 120 marks, while an 8 credits module paper is 1 x 2 hours and 100 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers instead of 1 paper, it is spelled out at the particular module. ❑ A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester / continuous assessment mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination. ❑ Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Apart from personal crises matters, students can qualify with a 45 - 49% in an examination for a supplementary. May-students can thus write a supplementary in August and the August students that qualify can write a supplementary in November. If a student qualifies for the supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.❑ If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees as for the first enrollment. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam. ❑ The School-Based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of‘lesson preparations’ and a third of ‘lesson presentations’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section.❑ Lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement.❑ English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses could be certified separately (Crebbin recommendation 3.2.3). ❑ The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete this Diploma over 2 years which means they must ensure that the subjects passed per semester will enable them to do that, thus 3 modules per semester.❑ Students could in future perhaps receive apart from the normal graduation papers, a summary of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

CERTIFICATE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION – CECE

The overall goal of the Certificate in Early Childhood Education is to develop skilled, committed and insightful beginners who have the subject knowledge and pedagogical skills to promote effective learning in early childhood settings.The aims of the initial Namibian Ministry of Education Early Childhood Development Certificate curriculum, proposed the following: ECD students are to:❑ Improve knowledge and understanding of how to care for children in their developmental stages, providing a safe nurturing and loving environment for the children;❑ Use available resources constructively, creatively and effectively;❑ Provide national uniformity to the programme followed at ECD centres;❑ Understand the significance of play for a child’s development;❑ Develop a lively, questioning, appreciative and creative intellect;❑ Develop positive self-esteem through social interaction, as well as self-confidence and understanding of the world they live in;❑ Provide for individual needs and aptitudes;❑ Promote and foster the highest moral and ethical values;❑ Develop and enhance respect for, understanding of and tolerance for other peoples’ religions, beliefs, cultures and ways of life;❑ Promote equal opportunities for life-long learning for male and females.
The design of this Certificate in Early Childhood Education recognises the correlation among access, admission and standard of the programme and therefore the following admission criteria are proposed. To qualify for admission to the ‘Certificate in Early Childhood Education’ an applicant shall satisfy any one of the following minimum requirements (a) OR (b) OR (c)(a) Be a holder of a Namibian Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary/ Higher or recognised equivalent with: ❑ A minimum of 19 points in five subjects according tothe grade evaluation table further on. ❑ One of the five subjects must be English NSSC Ordinary(English as a Second or First Language) obtained with a grade D minimum ❑ It is recommended that another one of the five best subjects is a Mother Tongue​​ OR(b) Meet the requirements of mature age entry which means: ❑ A student should be at least 23 years old on the day of registration ❑ Should have completed successfully junior secondary education (grade 10) with six subjects and a minimum of 20 points ❑ Has at least 3 years of early childhood teaching experience ❑ Has a ‘letter of recommendation’ from a management member of the school where h/she is / was teaching to identify the suitability of a candidate as a teacher ❑ Pass an IOL oral and written test about English proficiency on a 50% level. ❑ Has no criminal recordOR(c) Transfer from the IOL Junior Primary Diploma ❑ A student who passed the following modules in the IOL Junior Primary Diploma will receive credit for these modules when they transfer it to the Early Childhood Certificate: ‘English and Academic Communication Skills 1; Mother Tongue Literacy and Development 1; Religious, Moral and Life Skills Education 1; 1’; Learner Support: School Readiness, Diversity & Multi-grade teaching and Environmental Education 1’. ❑ ‘Learner Development and Learning’ and ‘Classroom Teaching and Management’ passed in the Junior Primary Diploma will not receive credit in the Early Childhood Education Certificate. ❑ ‘Numeracy and Mathematics 1’, ‘Children’s Literature and Reading Support’ ,’Visual Art’ and ‘Music Dance and Drama’, and ‘Physical and Health Education 1’ passed in the Junior Primary Diploma will not receive credit in the Early Childhood Education Certificate. ❑ ‘Educational Management’ passed in the Junior Primary Diploma will not receive credit in the Early Childhood Education Certificate.OR (e) Transfer from the IOL Pre-Primary Diploma ❑ A student who passed the following modules in the IOL Pre-Primary Diploma will receive credit for these modules when they transfer it to the Early Childhood Certificate:“English and Academic Communication Skills 1; Life Orientation and Life Skills 1 and Environmental Education 1’.
IOL offers most programmes via the distance education mode which broadens the access to tertiary education, because students do not have to move to Windhoek.
This full time level 5 certificate is offered over 1 year via distance with a combination of telephone tutoring and vacation school face-to-face sessions. Distance candidates may use 3 years to complete this qualification on a part time basis.
The following exit learning outcomes of the proposed IOL Certificate in Early Childhood Education correlate with the sequence of this Certificate’s curriculum. The exit outcomes for the incorporated modules are as follows.Students who have completed this certificate would be able to:(1) Clarify and demonstrate general and academic English proficiency in listening, reading, and speaking, and the correct use of grammar.(2) Examine issues of language in society, language development theory and practices in early childhood as well as mother tongue structure, grammar and use up to grade 1.(3) Examine issues regarding the development of religious identity, values, emotional intelligent social behaviour, Life Skills and the teaching-learning aspects of the early childhood and grade 1 RME syllabus.(4) Examine the broad range of the development features of the different ages of early childhood learners as well as characteristics of their learning.(5) Explain school readiness, diversity and multi-grade teaching theories and activities.(6) Explain the functioning of the human body and handling of stress, early childhood physical education activities,healthy nutrition and living as well as school safety and some first aid practices.(7) Execute specified early childhood school-based observation tasks covering the modules in a particular period of the curriculum, write lesson preparations and present lessons.(8) Analyse the developmental role of literature for early childhood learners, the reading process theories, teaching of reading and selecting of reading materials, and how to support early reading difficulties.(9) Examine the value, important aspects and activities of early childhood learners in visual art, music, dancing and drama.(10) Analyse important early childhood curriculum, teaching and classroom management issues; apply effectively the thematic lesson plans as set out in the NIED Pre-Primary Teacher’s Manual, using appropriate teaching-learning activities and media.(11) Explain the content, activities, resources and assessment for the development of early childhood preparatory mathematics according to the nine themes of the early childhood curriculum.(12) Explore features of health, nutrition and safety as well as dimensions of the social and natural environment.(13) Examine guidelines on Early Childhood education; features of management and leadership; the planning of indoor and outdoor learning environments; administration documents and financial and personnel management issues.These outcomes are supportive of employment as early childhood assistant teachers in the private or public sector and allows for the awarding of a level - 5 Certificate in Education.
This section typically depicts the complete curriculum per year and semester and includes the core and elective modules, their codes, credits, NQA levels and prerequisites. Such a curriculum overview support the analysis of the weight per module related to the exit outcomes, the amount of expected learning hours per semester, credits and level requirements per module, fees per semester and year, lecturers and materials needed per semester and so forth. Clarifications of the curriculum are also offered to promote accurate understanding of it by all current and future stakeholders.Stakeholders typically need to have an opportunity to evaluate the curriculum and provide input. Apart from international research findings about higher and teacher education and Australian, Hong Kong and Canadian examples of Early Childhood Education qualifications, many local stakeholders such as Regional directors, staff from NIED, early childhood centre principals and a Teachers Union have provided input about the Certificate in Early Childhood Education. The local stakeholders’ input is available in Appendix 3.The curriculum framework reflects the systematic ideas of the rationale and exit outcomes and the workload of the proposed one year programme is challenging.* Clarifications of the Certificate in Early Childhood Education curriculum(a) Full time students (enrol for all subjects per semester as set out above) have a workload of 6 modules per semester, plus the School-based training, with a total of 62 in the first and 60 credits in the second semester. Each credit requires ten learning hours. Students could however complete the Certificate over 3 years on a part time basis. That implies enrolling for 2 modules per semester for 6 semesters.(b) The NQF Certificate level 5 requirements are met. This programme comprises 122 credits which are far above the NQF minimum credit requirements. All of the 122credits are on level 5 which is 50 credits more than the NQF requirements of 72 credits on the level of certification. More credits than 72 on level 5 implies a higher quality programme and allows for a broad base to expand the Certificate to a level 6 Diploma. There is a 58:64 credit ratio among school subject content and professional subject credits. The almost 50:50 ratio between school subject and pedagogical knowledge is an excellent ratio. (c) The latest 2015 national prescribed curriculum subjects of the early childhood phase cover the Mother Tongue / First language, Numeracy, Environmental Studies, Arts,Religious and Moral Education (including Life Skills), Physical Education and Reading and are addressed in this certificate. The module titles and content of the Certificate in Early Childhood Education reflect the rationale and exit learning outcomes and a CBE systematic ‘design down’ is thus observable.(d) This Certificate in Early Childhood Education is designed to allow students into a second year of Early Childhood Education and the two years together qualify students for a level 6 Diploma. This way mobility between qualifications is promoted. In order for a student to obtain a diploma if another year is completed after the first level-5 certificate, this first level must also be 120 credits and not the unacceptable 40 credits of the current NQF requirements.(e) Namibian indigenous circumstances and policies are addressed and available NIED documents for teachers are prescribed in the professional subjects, e.g. ‘The manual for pre-primary teachers’, and the NIED document on ‘School readiness, diversity’, multi-grade teaching and reading development’. NIED approved school textbooks are also prescribed for the Certificate students.(f) The application of theories in all the professional subjects in order to develop teaching skills is emphasised. Many of these professional skills accommodate employability skills, general education / citizenship skills and the holistic wellness perspectives. See for example, ‘Religious, Moral and Life Skills Education 1’ and ‘Environmental Education 1’.(g) As the ‘situation analysis’ details suggest the Early Childhood Education curriculum further addresses ‘English language proficiency; Mother Tongue Development and Literacy and proper admission criteria. The module ‘Early Childhood Literature and Reading Development’ is in line with the National Conference of 2011 perspectives to promote reading among learners. In addition, ‘AIDS awareness’ and ‘good governance’ of Vision 2030 and proper ‘tertiary assessment’ regulations as recommended by Crebbin, et al., are adhered to.(h) The ‘quality perspective’ of the curriculum is one which consists of both the ‘education and training’ (or knowledge and skills) dimensions that are typical of the CBE transformational paradigm, e.g. subject knowledge and the didactics of it. The Subject Didactics encompasses also the LCE paradigm as advocated in Namibia, as is demonstrated by all the modules, e.g. ‘Early Childhood Preparatory Mathematics, ‘School readiness, Diversity andMulti-grade teaching, ‘Early Childhood Physical and Health Education 1’ and ‘Early Childhood Curriculum Teaching’.(i) The prerequisites for courses are kept to a minimum in order not to slow down student progress unnecessary: Only one module ‘School-Based Studies phase 2’ requires a pass in School-Based Studies phase 1.(j) The Diploma incorporates furthermore local and international trends in higher education, such as the development of occupational competence as well as citizenship; the importance of ICT; responsiveness to local needs; co-operation rather than competition between teachers; awareness of HIV/AIDS and other global issuesand the combination of purposefully selected disciplinary knowledge into modules.
This assessment policy section reflects the guidelines for admission to first and second opportunity exams, passing theoretical or practical components, as well as the applicable academic progression rules. Assessment policies are reflecting the promotion of high or low standards of education and is therefore very important. Low standards of education do neither individuals nor the country any favors. ❑ Assessment per semester modules consists of at least 1 assignment of 100 marks for modules worth 8 credits and 1 assignment of 120 marks for modules worth 10 or12 credits. ❑ A 50% semester assessment mark is required for admission to examinations. ❑ Where practical work is applicable, a 60% pass is required and such practical work could account for 50% of the semester mark. This applies to School-Based Studies as well. ❑ Assignments typically follow the format and standard of the examination papers in order to prepare students for the format and standard of examinations. The degree of difficulty for assignments and examination papers are compiled as follows: Basic knowledge, comprehension and skills count for 70%; Higher levels (application, analysis and synthesis verbs) count for 20% and very high levels (of evaluation, comparing and critical thinking) counts for 10% of the total marks.❑ Re-submission of assignments is permissible at extra costs but in practical terms it is often impossible to meet submission deadlines before writing the examination.❑ Semester assignment marks will be nullified if students are guilty of plagiarism and consequently forfeit admission to the examination. ❑ The duration of the examination depends on the credits of a module to ensure valid assessment results, e.g. for 10 or12 credits modules the examination is typical 1 x two and a half-hour written examination of 120 marks, while an 8 credits module paper is 1 x 2 hours and 100 marks. Where modules have 2 examination papers instead of 1 paper, it is spelled out at the particular module.❑ A final pass mark of 50% is required, calculated by 60% of the examination mark and 40% of the semester / continuous assessment mark. A sub-minimum of 50% must be attained in the examination. ❑ Students commonly write examinations at the end of the semester on completion of a module. There is a first semester examination in May and a second semester examination in August. Apart from personal crises matters, students can qualify with a 45 - 49% in an examination for a supplementary. May-students can thus write a supplementary in August and the August students that qualify can write a supplementary in November. If a student qualifies for the supplementary examination, s/he can write the supplementary examination without having to redo the assignments or pay re-registration fees.❑ If a student fails the supplementary examination and wants to continue s/he must re-register for a module, compile a new semester mark and pay relevant fees as for the first enrollment. This rule also applies to efforts beyond the third exam. ❑ The School-Based assignments comprise three sections. One section consists of ‘observational tasks’, the second of‘lesson preparations’ and a third of ‘lesson presentations’. All sections are assessed and must be passed independently on a 60% level before practical marks are averaged. If a student fails in one section s/he is allowed a second opportunity to replace the failed mark of that section. ❑ Lecturers must provide students with written feedback on assignments, indicating the general strengths and shortcomings and provide recommendations for improvement. ❑ English proficiency, ICT and First Aid courses could be certified separately (Crebbin recommendation 3.2.3). ❑ The academic advancement rules are as follows: The pre-requisites of a module must be passed before the next module could be enrolled for. (A co-requisite is a module that could be taken together with another module.) IOL allows registration of all modules in each semester and pre-requisites are limited to support students’ progression. Students may complete this Certificate over 2 years which means they must ensure that the subjects passed per semester will enable them to do that, thus 3 modules per semester. ❑ Students could receive apart from the normal graduation papers a summary of the competencies that they have mastered during the programme.

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